Death certificate information


John Anderson
 

I am looking for some explanation regarding the certificate of death (attached ) of my paternal great-great grandfather, Henry KLINE. Here is what I already know:
1. Henry KLINE (KLEIN on his d.c.) was born in Strasbourg, Alsace-Lorraine around Jul 1831. He came to the US around 1846, and settled in Hamilton County (Cincinnati), Ohio, but late lived in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio.
2.  He married Amelia HIMMELREICH 13 Aug 1855 in Hamilton County, Ohio.
3. He worked as a " loan broker,"  "jeweler" or "merchant" over the years.

Now come my questions:
1. The d.c. gives his place of death as what appears to be 3 Livingston Place, 13th Ward of New York City. I know of Livingston Street in Brooklyn, but no Place.
2. The undertaker and Medical Attendant both give addresses in Manhattan: 206 6th Street and 235 E. 10th Street. Why would they have attended him if he died in Brooklyn?
3. Cause of his death is given as "Hepatitis diffusa;" what is the "diffusa" part?
4. Contributing to his death was "Collapsus." what was that?
5. Date of burial in Cypress Hill Cemetery appears to be Jan 18, 1875, but I am not sure if it is that or Jan. 16.
6. Given that the time from attack to his death was only 3 weeks, is that normal?

Any ideas will be appreciated.

John Anderson,
Orlando, Florida


Renee Steinig
 

Livingston Place was in Manhattan, It was renamed in the 1950s and became Perlman Place -- in memory of  New York State Judge Nathan David Perlman.

More about the street:

Not mentioned on that site is an interesting aspect of Perlman's biography: 
In the 1930s, not finding a legal means to break up German-American Bund rallies in New York City, he called on gangster Meyer Lansky for help. Lansky and his fellow Jewish mobsters went on to attack many of those rallies.

Google PERLMAN LANSKY for a number of interesting articles.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...


John Anderson <counselor12721@...> wrote:

.... The d.c. gives his place of death as what appears to be 3 Livingston Place, 13th Ward of New York City. I know of Livingston Street in Brooklyn, but no Place....
 


boris
 

There is a book (I can’t recall the title) about Jewish gangsters of the 30's. Its main premise, if I remember it right, was that Jewish gangsters literally broke the back of the German Bund who was openly pro-Nazis.


--
_______________________________________
Boris Feldblyum
boris@...


John Anderson
 

Thank you, Renee! Very interesting article and links....

John


On Mar 1, 2020, at 4:23 PM, Renee Steinig <genmaven@...> wrote:


Livingston Place was in Manhattan, It was renamed in the 1950s and became Perlman Place -- in memory of  New York State Judge Nathan David Perlman.

More about the street:

Not mentioned on that site is an interesting aspect of Perlman's biography: 
In the 1930s, not finding a legal means to break up German-American Bund rallies in New York City, he called on gangster Meyer Lansky for help. Lansky and his fellow Jewish mobsters went on to attack many of those rallies.

Google PERLMAN LANSKY for a number of interesting articles.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...


John Anderson <counselor12721@...> wrote:

.... The d.c. gives his place of death as what appears to be 3 Livingston Place, 13th Ward of New York City. I know of Livingston Street in Brooklyn, but no Place....
 


Nurit Har-zvi
 

There is a book called Tough Jews by Rich Cohen about Jewish gangsters. I don't know if that's the one you're thinking of, but it was a very good book.
Nurit Har-zvi


Elise Cundiff
 

Diffusa = diffused but hepatitis is localized to the liver.  Perhaps in this (archaic) context it is referring to the effects of fulminant hepatitis having led to deleterious and eventually fatal effect on  the entire body.    
Collapsus = collapse and could, in this (again, archaic) context mean either cardiovascular collapse (ie shock, the  final event in disease progression) or pulmonary (lung) collapse (literally a collapse or squeezing of lung tissue.).  As the liver becomes extremely diseased, fluids aren't processed through it normally and will build up in the abdomen (ascites) leading to increased pressure that can interfere with breathing, and eventually fluid can accumulate in the lung space too, taking up the room that the lung needs to expand when we inhale.  Eventually the circulatory system will collapse due to the shift of fluid.


Elise Cundiff
 

And yes, fulminant hepatitis can be fatal that quickly.    This is usually due to infectious hepatitis but can be from a toxin as well.


EdrieAnne Broughton
 

We read a free book from Audible called "The Minute Man" by Greg Donahue that was on this subject.  Very good book.


Shelley Mitchell
 

The words used are in Latin.
Easy to translate using internet.
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia. 


Ira Leviton
 

Hepatitis diffusa translates to "diffuse hepatitis" which should be considered simply to be a description that it was inflammation of the liver that was diffuse throughout the liver, not localized to one area of the liver.  Keep in mind that at that time, doctors had no knowledge of viruses like hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or other causes of liver disease other than alcohol.  Collapsus translates to "collapse" and is also simply descriptive; it does not have any modern medical meaning.

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.