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Origin of the name Liss #names

Michael Hoffman
 

Hello Nancy S,

Would you be interested in a copy of the Marriage Certificate of the marriage of a Harris Liss to Rachel Shamrock, which took place in London, ENGLAND in 1898, Harris Liss's father is an Israel Liss. There is a record in the archives of YIVO, in the Industrial Removal Records when this couple moved to Illinois from NYC.

Regards,

Michael Hoffman
Borehamwood
HERTS UK 

Researching:- SCHAMROTH / SHAMROCK, Krakow, Poland, London, UK and USA.   

Peter Dreifuss
 

Dear Nancy and  other Jewishgeners,
Outside of the question of the geographical origin of your family, a good starting point for the origin of most Jewish names can be obtained searching the records of Beit Hafutsot.
A search for Lyss yields the following:

Surnames derive from one of many different origins. Sometimes there may be more than one explanation for the same name. Lys is a toponymic (derived from a geographic name of a town, city, region or country). Surnames that are based on place names do not always testify to direct origin from that place, but may indicate an indirect relation between the name-bearer or his ancestors and the place, such as birth place, temporary residence, trade, or family-relatives.

Lyss and Lys are spelling variants of Liss, which has links with Lissa, the German name of the village Lysa Nad Labem in central Bohemia; with Leszno, near Poznan/Posen, in western Poland, also called Lissa, where Jews lived since the 16th century; with Leipsos/Lipsos, whose Italian name is Lisso, an Aegean island in the Dodecanese, Greece; and with Lodz, the city in western Poland which the Germans call Litzmannstadt. The family names can also be related to Lis, the Polish term for "fox", applied as a nickname to cunning people and/or redheads. Yet another possible association can be made with the French meaning of Lis, for the flower "lily".
For more specific placement I recommend consulting one of the more thoroughly researched books written by Alexander Beider, such as
A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire.


Pete Dreifuss
Silver Spring, MD

 

Peninah Zilberman
 

Good Day,

It is possible that the person who used LISS as a  last name used their first  to make it last,

Liss is some kind of a short form for …. Elyse, Elisa, Elise etc. like in Jewish its usually becomes Esther

Maybe they arrived to the New World and didn’t want to have a Jewish sounding name.

Good Luck

Peninah

 

 

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Peninah Zilberman

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Eric M. Bloch
 

In researching the surname LISCHINSKY, I've found some of the families changing their surname to LISS.

Eric Bloch
Milwaukee, WI

LISHCHINSKY  (Belaya Tserkov, Vasilkov uyezd, Kiev giburnia)

Sherri Bobish
 
Edited

Nancy,

On the Ellis Island Database there is an Abram Lisser arriving 14 Nov 1900 from "Motow."
Perhaps this is actually Motol?  I've seen plenty of misspellings on passenger manifests.

Take a look at the manifest, and see if any of the other information seems familiar.

Regards,   Sherri Bobish   Princeton, NJ

Clifford S. Goldfarb
 

My grandmother, Sarah Leah Eisenberg, came from Chmielnik, near Kielce, in Poland. Her family had married twice into the Liss family of the same town in the 19th century. My father Max Goldfarb was in contact with one of his Liss cousins who had survived the War and was living in Paris. There is a family tree for the Kielce area Liss family in Charles Van Onselen’s somewhat controversial book, The Fox and the Flies.

 

Cliff Goldfarb  cgoldfarb@...

Susan&David
 

See if you can find a naturalization record for a member of your LISS family.   It could give the name upon arrival and/or the ship.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 4/4/2020 1:09 PM, N. Summers via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Does anyone have any thoughts on the origins of the surname Liss/Lyss? When I try to search for passenger records, the only suggestions I get are Scandinavian names. My relatives came from Motol, not far from MInsk. ( think Motol was Chaim Weitzman's home town, and I'm sure everyone from the town claims to have known him or his family).

When the family came to New York, most of them changed their name to Alper (for good luck, as they knew someone by that name who was prosperous).

thank you,

Nancy S

Maryland, USA

 

FINKELSTEIN, BOOKSTEIN, KOENIG/SUKOENIG, LUSMAN, GOLDINER, SAGORODER/ZAGORODER (Radziwillow, Belarus/Ukraine; Ostrog, Poland/Belarus)

LISS/ALPER, LEAF/LIFSCHITZ ( Motol, Russian Empire/Belarus; Rechitsa, Belarus)


N. Summers
 

Does anyone have any thoughts on the origins of the surname Liss/Lyss? When I try to search for passenger records, the only suggestions I get are Scandinavian names. My relatives came from Motol, not far from MInsk. ( think Motol was Chaim Weitzman's home town, and I'm sure everyone from the town claims to have known him or his family).

When the family came to New York, most of them changed their name to Alper (for good luck, as they knew someone by that name who was prosperous).

thank you,

Nancy S

Maryland, USA

 

FINKELSTEIN, BOOKSTEIN, KOENIG/SUKOENIG, LUSMAN, GOLDINER, SAGORODER/ZAGORODER (Radziwillow, Belarus/Ukraine; Ostrog, Poland/Belarus)

LISS/ALPER, LEAF/LIFSCHITZ ( Motol, Russian Empire/Belarus; Rechitsa, Belarus)