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UNSURE IF THESE ARE NAMES ! #names


Marilyn Weinman
 

In looking over documents and letters from a brother of my Grandfather, I've noticed what i believe are names of children, biut I'm not sure if these are male or female names, or if they're even names at all !! 
The words, that appear to be names are Leiser,Cerne,and Breine
Can someone please help me with this, and also if they are names, are there English, or American equivalents.
Thanks so much, and Be well everyone !
--
Marilyn Weinman


sharon yampell
 

Leiser or Leizer ….Male name…in my family, Louis

Breine or Brane…Female name…in my family, Bertha

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ USA

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

From: Marilyn Weinman
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2020 8:53 PM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] UNSURE IF THESE ARE NAMES ! #names

 

In looking over documents and letters from a brother of my Grandfather, I've noticed what i believe are names of children, biut I'm not sure if these are male or female names, or if they're even names at all !! 
The words, that appear to be names are Leiser,Cerne,and Breine
Can someone please help me with this, and also if they are names, are there English, or American equivalents.
Thanks so much, and Be well everyone !
--
Marilyn Weinman

 


Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Leiser/Leizer is a male name. It’s a short form of Eliezer. But he could have used any name in the “new world."

Cerne and Breine/Bryna are female names. No equivilants. My secular name is Barbara, but my religious name is Breindel (a diminutive of Brina. But I, my cousin Bina, and another cousin Ruth all have the religious name Breindel.

Barbara Mannlein
Tucson, AZ

On Apr 20, 2020, at 4:20 PM, Marilyn Weinman <marilynweinman@...> wrote:
In looking over documents and letters from a brother of my Grandfather, I've noticed what i believe are names of children, biut I'm not sure if these are male or female names, or if they're even names at all !!
The words, that appear to be names are Leiser,Cerne,and Breine
Can someone please help me with this, and also if they are names, are there English, or American equivalents.


Andy Monat
 

Re given name "Cerne": You can see the Hebrew spelling for what I assume is the same name as your Cerne on this grave marker for an ancestor of mine, Hannah Berkowitz Weiss. (Hebrew is צשארנע, or tsadi-shin-aleph-resh-nun-ayin).

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/76180134/hannah-weiss

It also seems to be included in Dr. Alexander Beider's Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names as Tsherne, as seen in the index here.


David Lewin
 


Google Translate gives the dead opposite:

Translations of Cerne
adverb

in the black



At 02:34 22/04/2020, Andy Monat wrote:
Re given name "Cerne": You can see the Hebrew spelling for what I assume is the same name as your Cerne on this grave marker for an ancestor of mine, Hannah Berkowitz Weiss. (Hebrew is צש×�×¨× ×¢, or tsadi-shin-aleph-resh-nun-ayin).

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/76180134/hannah-weiss

It also seems to be included in Dr. Alexander Beider's Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names as Tsherne, as seen in the index here.


Reinier
 

Leiser is equivalent to Eliezer. As for Jews in Hungary (my family was Hungarian and I have several of such examples), the full name could be Eliezer Lazar. 
Cerne is female, and Breine as well. 


jrsackerman@...
 

Leiser - nickname for Eliezer; Louis is a common corresponding English name but people sometimes chose a different name for some reason.
Cerne or Tserne often came out as Shirley or Cecilia in English but again people cold chose whatever name they liked.


Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Leizer is short for Eliezer, a Hebrew male name. Cerne is probably Czarna (pronounced Charna, with a ch like in charm), a woman's name, from the Polish word for "black." Breine or the diminutive Braindl or similar is a Yiddish name for women, meaning "brown." Polish and Yiddish names were quite common among Jews, especially women, and not everyone had a Hebrew name. As far as what their English equivalents might have been, people who anglicized their names often chose something that sounded similar to the original, or started with the first letter/s of the original, but not always.

All the best,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel. 


Elise Cundiff
 

The Brina in my family went by Blanche in the USA.   My uncle was named for his great-grandfather Lazar, and was called Lawrence. So you see there are many examples to show that any name with the same first letter could have been chosen for use in America,