Topics

Passenger arrival records #usa #general


Gayle Schlissel Riley
 

I am so upset at the difficulty of finding passenger arrival records, at least for me. Example..my grandfather came from the Minsk area of Russia to live at Mt Forest Canada. His father went first Jacob Levine, then this brother Morris and last his grandmother mother Balya Levine(Cohen) who traveled with Ana born 1889, then Sam 1893 and last Nellie 1898. I am told they came around 1905. BUT which port. Sam lied that he was born in Canada.
I have done genealogy for many years with a lot of success but passenger list are so hard for me to have luck in..
Can someone give me hints? They all show up on the 1911 census. The libraries in Mt Forest gave me so many newspaper stories and pics. I got records on family in Minsk. Even a pic of the family house.
Please help me.
I will be posting the 1939 list of the population for Tarnobrzeg, Poland soon

Please reply in private email to   Gayle Schlissel Riley <keys2pst@...>


Diane Jacobs
 

Have you tried stevemorse.org

It has numerous ports going  to the US. 
Also has Canadian  passenger and border crossings. These are very helpful.

Be sure to search phonetically for all surnames.

Hope this helps.

Diane Jacobs 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Gayle Schlissel Riley via groups.jewishgen.org" <keys2pst=yahoo.com@...>
Date: 5/3/20 9:29 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Passenger arrival records #usa #general

I am so upset at the difficulty of finding passenger arrival records, at least for me. Example..my grandfather came from the Minsk area of Russia to live at Mt Forest Canada. His father went first Jacob Levine, then this brother Morris and last his grandmother mother Balya Levine(Cohen) who traveled with Ana born 1889, then Sam 1893 and last Nellie 1898. I am told they came around 1905. BUT which port. Sam lied that he was born in Canada.
I have done genealogy for many years with a lot of success but passenger list are so hard for me to have luck in..
Can someone give me hints? They all show up on the 1911 census. The libraries in Mt Forest gave me so many newspaper stories and pics. I got records on family in Minsk. Even a pic of the family house.
Please help me.
I will be posting the 1939 list of the population for Tarnobrzeg, Poland soon

Please reply in private email to   Gayle Schlissel Riley <keys2pst@...>
--
Diane Jacobs


Karen Gwynn
 

What I found helpful is to remember that (1) the name on the passenger list will the name they used in "the old country," which can be different from the name you know them as and (2) it is very likely that you will run into spelling differences, especially when looking at indexes that were created by some reading the original and creating the index entries.  This seems to be especially true when looking for relatives who came to North America from Eastern Europe, but can even apply to "simple" names, as the person who spoke their name to the ship's representative probably had an accent that may not have been understandable. Add to that the fact that many could not spell their names, or they spelled them in their native language, adds to the "mistakes" on the passenger lists.
 
To attempt to overcome the first issue, work backwards. Find the person's death records which will hopefully lead you to their grave site. If their headstone has a Hebrew inscription, chances are you will be able to find their Hebrew name, which could lead you to the name they immigrated under. For example, I always knew one great-grandmother as Anna. However, after having her headstone translated, I found that she was Chana. That was a big clue to finding her immigration record. 
 
Which leads to the next thing: find their immigration records. Even if you are not fortunate enough to get all their papers, whatever you can find could help narrow your search. I personally have had mixed results with these records, having all the papers for one ancestor and only index entries for another. For one great-grandfather, I discovered he had changed the family name (during his naturalization process), and once I discovered that it had been Pessis (not Pass, as known today), I could find the necessary passenger lists. But by using these "breadcrumbs," you can begin to piece together when and where they landed in North America. Finding the first papers, or their initial immigration records, could also provide a date and place where they arrived. Caveat: what I'm referring to here are the papers and documents for immigrating to America, as I do not have experience with Canadian records, so I don't know specifically what is on them, how to find them, etc.
 
Once you can narrow the focus of when your ancestor arrived, check for all name spellings in all available databases for all reasonable ports of entry. Don't forget that there were many ports of entry during different time periods. So, you'll need to know which ports were used during the time frame you are searching. For example, I (wrongly) assumed that all my ancestors arrived at an Eastern U.S. port. After being stymied for a while with one great-grandfather, and by doing some history research, I pieced together that, since he ended up in Alabama, he might have come in from the Southeastern U.S., and sure enough, he arrived through Galveston, TX, something no one in our family was aware of.
 
Oh, one other thing I just thought of: if you have extended family (uncles particularly) who immigrated, do the same type of search for them. I found a 2nd great grandmother through by locating her son, my great-uncle.
 
Best of luck. Finding passenger records can be a challenge, but is very rewarding once discovered.
 
Karen Gwynn   <kwgwynn@...>


Joel Weintraub
 

I want to remind the group that I have an Infofile at JewishGen showing and testing a number of strategies for finding difficult passenger manifests at Ellis Island.  Some of the strategies are pretty powerful, but not well known.  I was scheduled to give a talk on this at the 2020 IAJGS San Diego Conference, now cancelled.  Perhaps if the conference organizers go virtual and I’m one of the people they pick, I can do it online.  In the meantime, I’ll include here my handout for the talk which includes more hints then my InfoFile, and contains a link to my  JewishGen Infofile: https://www.dropbox.com/s/gyj9vkpg1u1enuu/IAJGS2020Search.docx?dl=0
 
Joel Weintraub,   Dana Point, CA   <JWeintraub@...>


Marshall Lerner
 

For years I had absolutely no success in finding the immigration record for my paternal grandfather. I knew the date of his arrival from his naturalization papers but I could never find his name on any manifest. Then a colleague at a local Jewish Genealogy club offered to help. 

He discovered that my gf had arrived with a different name than the one I always knew him as. And it was the same surname as my grand uncle and great grandfather had used when they first arrived in the US. My grand uncle changed his name and the other family members followed his lead with all adopting the new last name.

My colleague had the patience to compare ship manifests for both the ship my grandfather had traveled on and the ship my grand uncle had traveled on. He discovered an individual on each manifest with the same name, from the same town in Bessarabia with the correct ages. The mystery was solved. My great grand father made 3 voyages to the US and mentioned my grand uncle on 2 of the voyages. My grand father mentioned him as well.That allowed us to confirm the accuracy of my colleague's discovery.

Patience, persistence and creative thinking generally pays off.

<marshall.lerner@...>             Signature: Please “sign” your posts and replies by including your full name at the end of your email.


Marjorie Geiser
 

I'll share one other thing in regards to finding ship manifests.
 
I also had a heck of a time finding the manifest for my grandfather, Jacob Levine (unfortunately, not related to the original poster..). I had his naturalization papers, which said he immigrated in 1906. I knew he had to have come with his mother, since he was born in 1902.
 
I FINALLY found his manifest, with his mother and two older sisters... in 1905.
 
So, my point is that even naturalization papers may not be accurate.
 
Margie
Marjorie Geiser
Northern Arizona, USA
 

LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/ZYLBERNAGEL/SILVER, EPSTEJN, MOCZYDLOWER/MOCHEDLOVER, ERLICH, GRUNPELTZ, JOSKOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN, ABRAHAMOWICZ, SZTABINSKA, WILK


kisanders
 

I had a terrible time trying to find several relatives in manifests. In one case, my aunt's name was reversed!  So try searching for her last name in the given name area. In another manifest, my grandmother, Bacie Siberdi, was listed at "Basic Liberty."  I have no idea how they got that so wrong...they also listed her (in the index) as being from Germany, even though it said on the manifest that she was from Romania.  I found the manifest using the wold card (*) for the first letter of her given and family names.
Don't give up!

Karen Sanders
West Haven, CT


Morton Rumberg
 

Karen Sanders wrote: >In another manifest, my grandmother, Bacie Siberdi, was listed at "Basic Liberty." I have no idea how they got that so wrong.<

It's easy to get it wrong. Actually, I suspect the interpretation is by the reader of the handwriting. People using script often write some letters that look very similar to others. In this case the s and c and e of the given name look enough alike to misinterpret. I‘m sure the same thing happened with the surname: Capitol S and L can look alike as can the di and ty, depending on how carefully the name was written.

I am a transcriber for some of the old records and it is amazing how language/handwriting gets so garbled. You have to be extremely careful interpreting each letter.

Mort Rumberg
Sacramento CA area


itencorinne@...
 


Jx. Gx.
 

Gayle, I am responding to your May 4 posting about the difficulty you are having finding family members on passenger arrival records.  I had similar experiences finding my grandfather and great-grandfather and maybe what I have to say will be of help to you.  I searched in vain for my grandfather at the Ellis Island website using his Hebrew and English names setting the time frame slightly beyond the dates I gleaned from census records and his naturalization papers. I then searched the Ellis Island site by using only his surname.  That produced probably 100 or more possibilities. I went through each of those names regardless of the first name that was on the passenger list.  I finally found him using the nickname "Alter."  That appears to be a somewhat common nickname.

Finding my great-grandfather was even more difficult.  After exhausting every possibility at the Ellis Island site, I was prepared to give up the search when I came across a Canadian site.
https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/passenger-lists/passenger-lists-quebec-port-1865-1900/Pages/introduction.aspx
However, my hopes were again dashed.  I then went to https://www.familysearch.org/search/ and under the record category "Vermont, St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings, 1895-1954," I found my great-grandfather. He had sailed from the UK to Quebec, Canada, and made his way to New York passing through the U.S. immigration station at St. Albans, Vermont.  He should have showed up on the Canadian site, but maybe their records are incomplete.

I found that some of the ship passenger records on the Ellis Island site are not as high quality as the same record on familysearch.com.  I recommend viewing both sites to select the best copy.

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona
mrme1914@...       


Marian
 

Mort makes an important point about the opportunity for errors during transcription.  I would only add that there were multiple opportunities for such errors and that might make the problem worse in some cases.  

From the late 19th c. through to World War I, the name given when purchasing the steamship ticket was the name captured on ticket-sale documents.  Those were then forwarded to the steamship line at the port of departure, places like Hamburg, Germany, or Havre, France, or Southampton, England, where the name was transcribed from the ticket-seller's return onto a manifest form.  That transcription happened at least once and could happen multiple times in the manifest-preparation process.  Each transcription was an opportunity for error.

Then a century or more later the data was transcribed from the lists (now often on faded microfilm) again to create our searchable online indices.  This transcription again opened the door to possible errors, but might also further mangle a name already erroneously transcribed long ago.  

Given this game of telephone in creating the records and indices I'm often amazed at the quality of most of the data.


Laurie Sosna
 

Hi,

I have some Levins in my tree, I discovered their names were spelled Lewin, Lavin and Levy on their manifests.
Depending on the year they traveled, and where they departed, the manifests have differing amounts of detail.

You asked about arrival ports-
One traveled from Antwerp to St. John, New Brunswick in 1910.
More traveled from Liverpool to Montreal in 1911.
One from London to Montreal in 1912.
Another (non-Levin) immigrated from Le Havre to Ellis Island to Montreal in 1907.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA


kdspiro@...
 

Re: I am so upset at the difficulty of finding passenger arrival records...
I also have a few ancestors I haven't been able to find on manifests. I found my great grandparents' family by just continuing down the list of results in indexes to where the names got further from what I was actually looking for. I found Bina & John (Lazjer Jona) and 3 children listed on the manifest, not a transcription error as: 
Topka Saphira with wife Benie and children Rachel, Chiel & Marthe. In all other records from Poland he is a clear spelling variation of Jona Szpira or Szpiro. The children's names and ages, the arrival & destination (small town in Nova Scotia) all match so clearly it is the correct record. So broadening a search is useful. Also, not all Canadian manifests have been indexed so sometimes you have to narrow down as closely as possible to the date and then go through the manifests.
https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/passenger-lists/Pages/introduction.aspx
Also, I understand that not all manifest have survived.

I also have found indexes on jripoland with wife/husband last name reversed as well as birth records with registration date as date of birth (2 years later). So, there are errors. Also, I think going back even years later and redoing searches helps. You might have more information that makes new things jump out, see something you missed or even new records have been added.

Kathy Spiro
Smithers, BC Canada
SPIRO/SPIRA/SZPIRA/SZPIRO/ SZAPIRO Kielce, Lodz, Slomniki, Konskie, Checiny - Poland
RAFELOWICZ / EYZENBERG / GOLDBERG Kielce, Checiny - Poland
HECHT MOSCOVICZ, BELFER, DASCALU MANOLSON Darabani & surrounding towns - Rumania
RABINOWICZ, GOLDENSTEIN, GOLDNER Kishinev