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Divorce Among Jews in Poland #poland


Wendy Newman
 

My research has revealed a new relative (by marriage) that immigrated to New York from Poland in 1921.  Shortly after, he filled out a Declaration of Intention, stating that he was divorced, and had 3 grown children who were either in NY already or would be joining him shortly (all born in Warsaw).  In 1927, his petition once again claimed he was divorced, yet on the 1930 census, he declared he was married and was living with his 3 children.  His wife is my interest, as she is the relation to my family.  I don't think she ever came to the U.S.  I never came across divorce before in Poland and just wanted to confirm it did happen.  And ask if there is anything I can do to further research the wife that was left by her family?

Thanks,
Wendy Newman
researching Edelstein, Nudelman


Harvey Kabaker
 

Wendy, you don't mention whether you've checked the JRI-Poland database for marriage, divorce or birth records for them. That would be my first thought. Good luck.
Also, the census taker may have assumed he was married at that time, or your relative didn't want to say he was divorced.
Harvey Kabaker


Dan Oren
 

Divorce in Poland? Absolutely, it happened. In addition to following Harvey Kabaker's great suggestion previously in this thread, read more at <https://yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Marriage>.


Shelley Mitchell
 

Wendy -
Any divorce in Poland would probably occur in a religious setting like the marriage itself. The Rabbi would give a Gett. It’s possible that to avoid the “shame” of being divorced, it might not be announced on public records. However it would definitely be recorded by the Rabbi and the new marriage record would probably mention it.

When looking for the first wife, make sure to look for her under the surnames of both her parents. Their marriage would probably not be recognized if it wasn’t registered civilly.
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia.


Fay Bussgang
 

I have just been indexing records from Brzeziny for the early 1920s, and have come across several divorce records that are tucked in with the marriage records to which they refer. I am not sure that was true of all towns or all years, but that is how it was done in Brzeziny at a certain time.

Fay Bussgang


Sally Bruckheimer
 

I have been looking at Polish records from the mid-1800s recently, and divorce is not that rare. I have no idea about reasons, but a number of marriages have either the bride or groom divorced.
 
I guess my mother was wrong. She said nobody got divorced; just like nobody had children out of wedlock before 1960.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Dan Oren
 

As someone who has been taking oral histories for 43 years, I think better ways to understand a statement like "nobody got divorced" are "nobody I knew of got divorced" or "I never heard of anybody getting divorced" or "I was told that nobody got divorced." The speaker is usually being honest, to the best of their capacity, but they are not omniscient. Examination of written records or obtaining other oral histories often documents that blanket memories using a term like "nobody" might well be based on general patterns and customs, but are not absolutely true.


sbloom@...
 

My 4th great grandfather, a rabbi in central Poland in the mid 19th century, was clearly divorced from his first wife. Though I never found divorce records or reference to the divorce, town records clearly show that he had many children with a second wife (given that he was a rabbi, I assume they were absolutely religiously married and that he had a "get" from his first wife).  Also, I did find a death record for the first wife, well after the period of the second marriage and the births of the children with the second wife. She reverted to her maiden name in public records.

Oddly, one of his sons and some of his grandsons were also divorced. I don't know whether this was because the concept of divorce was more acceptable or whether this family may have had a wider rift with other families in the town. 

Then again, in some of my other branches I also have over 100 years of records, and not one divorce.

Chae-Ran Freeze wrote an excellent book on Jewish marriage and divorce in the Russian Empire, and though the book didn't include much of "Congress Poland," a number of the reasons for divorce may have been  common over a wider geography (everything from religious differences to falling out of love).  


Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends,
 
Fay Bussgang (below) commented about the Brzeziny records which she is extracting
for the JRI-Poland database.
 
Thus, it is timely to point out a feature of searching via the JRI-Poland.org database,
the ability to do an all data search.   Thus by doing an "any field" search for "divorce"
you will see results pointing to 3,248 divorce entries in the 6.1 million JRI-Poland record
entry database.
 
Try your own text search for unusual references at https://jri-poland.org/jriplweb.htm
 
Read more about the mission and activity of JRI-Poland here:
 
Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.  (Montreal, 514-484-0100)
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
 
 
Fay Bussgang wrote:
 
I have just been indexing records from Brzeziny for the early 1920s, and have
come across several divorce records that are tucked in with the marriage records
 to which they refer.
 
I am not sure that was true of all towns or all years, but that is how it was done in
Brzeziny at a certain time.
 
 
 
 



Adelle Gloger
 

My grandmother was married in Tarnapol  in 1890. I found the marriage record on JRI-Poland.
I had been told that she divorced after about one year. She remarried around 1900.  I thought that if she remarried, then perhaps her first husband also remarried. When I searched JRI-Poland for him, I discovered that there was a notation regarding the divorce on his marriage to the second wife.
 It was interesting to note that  the stated reason for the divorce was not the reason I had been given by my family. So, if you are looking for divorce information, do a search for the spouse of the first marriage.

 Adelle Weintraub Gloger
 Cleveland, Ohio
 agloger@...


Shelley Mitchell
 

It is my understanding that the decision to give a get was the husband’s. A wife might ask for one but she usually needed her husband’s consent.

As more European Jews came to the US, husbands often used the threat of refusing to give a get in order to get a very favorable civil divorce settlement. Over time, in places like NY, judges had to deal with that Jewish issue. I believe they ordered men to give their wives a get. Without a get, a religious woman could not remarry in the eyes of the community.
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia.