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Need to have a Stenographic Shorthand Note Deciphered #translation


Mark Halpern
 

I have a draft of a letter from an attorney to the US Department of State in July 1941 explaining that his client is attempting to bring his daughter and family to the US from Japan. The family had traveled from Warsaw to Vilna to Moscow and then on to Japan via the Trans-Siberian Railway and a ship. They were awaiting the receipt of their immigration visas in Japan, when the US State Department decided that all visas would from July 1, 1941 be issued only from Washington DC. Time had run out on the family in Japan. They spent the War in Shanghai and finally immigrated to America in 1947. 

At the bottom of this draft letter is the attached shorthand note, which I would like "translated." If anyone knows shorthand and can provide what this note says, I and the family of these immigrants will be very grateful.

Thank you and stay safe.

Mark Halpern
Conshohocken, PA, USA 


James
 

Mark, email me direct at james.castellan@...  I know someone near you who should be able to help if no one replies directly with a translation/transcription.


Nicole Heymans
 

Hi Mark,

I discovered about 17 years ago when attempting to make sense of my mother's 1942/1943 diary, entirely in shorthand, totally unrecognizable at first although I had learned shorthand at school, that there are at least as many shorthand systems as languages and probably many more.

It would help others to help you if you could provide a suggestion as to the probable language of the shorthand writer. It looks German to me but I have absolutely no knowledge of English shorthand.

Happy hunting,

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium


W David Stern
 

In the early 1920's my mother worked as a secretary in Germany.  She 
knew of at least two German shorthand systems. The one she used was Stolze-Schrey (spelling?).  If the document in question here is indeed 
from Germany, then you might want to pursue this.  
 
Googling "german shorthand systems" brings up several other systems, including Gabelsberger, which is the other system that my mother would mention.
 
-=David Stern=- in California


Mark Halpern
 

Thank you David. This shorthand was written in America.

Best regards,
Mark

 

On 2020-05-15 1:56 pm, W David Stern wrote:

In the early 1920's my mother worked as a secretary in Germany.  She 
knew of at least two German shorthand systems. The one she used was Stolze-Schrey (spelling?).  If the document in question here is indeed 
from Germany, then you might want to pursue this.  
 
Googling "german shorthand systems" brings up several other systems, including Gabelsberger, which is the other system that my mother would mention.
 
-=David Stern=- in California


Linda Kelley
 

The shorthand was probably Gregg Shorthand, not Pittman, which I learned.

Linda Wolfe Kelley

Portland, OR, USA


Barbara Sontz
 

Mark -

I'm not positive, but it looks like Gregg shorthand to me.  

https://doyouremember.com/38261/remember-gregg-shorthand-great-taking-notes

Barbara


sharonrf18@...
 

I learned Gregg shorthand eons ago and this does look familiar. There are  shorthand Facebook groups. I just used the search term “shorthand” and groups came up. Hopefully they can help you.


wbarr18136@...
 

Hello David.  I am also in California and need someone who can help translate German shorthand (some possibly Czech too).  DId you get any useful suggestions?
Thank you,
Barbara Barrett