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Ship Manifest codes #usa


jel
 

In the last column of the attached ship manifest from 1894, there are a few hyphenated codes. The column is titled Date and cause of death, although none of the codes appears to contain a date.
This ship arrived at the end of July 1894 in New York, sailing from Liverpool, England. The individual with "1-3" in that column did not succomb enroute, and, in fact, lived for almost 70 more years. The codes do not resemble those on later manifests relating to subsequent Naturalizations.
Any idea what they indicate?
Thanks,
Judith


Jim Peskin
 

I don't know the meaning of those codes, but I do work at Ellis Island. The Ellis Island Foundation Staff is working online while the museum is closed. Here is the contact info for the Foundation that runs the Immigration Center.  It's only a form, but they will direct you to someone who can help. 

https://www.libertyellisfoundation.org/contact-us


Marian
 

Hello Judith,

Those numbers in the Cause of Death column on Customs Lists have long been a source of confusion.  They are annotations made later by gov't statistical clerks when "coding" the documents for official US immigration statistics.  Clerks used that column for this data because it was usually the largest block of available empty space on the page.

Occasionally the column was used during the voyage to record a death, and those notations will typically contain an obvious date and sometimes a cause of death, or even "buried at sea."

Marian Smith


plutsk@...
 

 
You don't say above what information those numbers are coding, though presumably not for the cause and date of a death.  Is there a guide to what those codes mean, and might they be of any genealogical interest?  Thank you.
Steve Gold

"Those numbers in the Cause of Death column on Customs Lists have long been a source of confusion.  They are annotations made later by gov't statistical clerks when "coding" the documents for official US immigration statistics.  Clerks used that column for this data because it was usually the largest block of available empty space on the page.

Occasionally the column was used during the voyage to record a death, and those notations will typically contain an obvious date and sometimes a cause of death, or even "buried at sea.""

Marian Smith


Susan&David
 

These numbers in the last column are a count of the males - females on the passenger list. It is easily confirmed by looking at the column with the heading "Sex" and adding up the males and the females.  At the bottom of the last column there should be a total, e.g.,  16 -11- 27.   It was common to see this on passenger lists of this period.  There must have been a reason for doing this, but I have not seen it explained.

David Rosen, Boston, MA


On 5/27/2020 10:18 AM, plutsk@... wrote:
 
You don't say above what information those numbers are coding, though presumably not for the cause and date of a death.  Is there a guide to what those codes mean, and might they be of any genealogical interest?  Thank you.
Steve Gold

"Those numbers in the Cause of Death column on Customs Lists have long been a source of confusion.  They are annotations made later by gov't statistical clerks when "coding" the documents for official US immigration statistics.  Clerks used that column for this data because it was usually the largest block of available empty space on the page.

Occasionally the column was used during the voyage to record a death, and those notations will typically contain an obvious date and sometimes a cause of death, or even "buried at sea.""

Marian Smith


Stephan Owen Parnes
 

David Rosen is correct about the totals representing the count of males and females on the manifest page.

 

The reason for the various subtotals as you move down the page has to do with the tally of the passengers by nationality.  Thus, on this page, for example, there are 2 males and 0 females from England, 1 male and 0 females from Bohemia, 2 males and 1 female from Holland, 9 males and 5 females from Germany, and so forth.

 

The tally is usually to the right of the first mention of a particular nationality as you move down the manifest.  Here, however, you may note that the tally for Germany is found to the right of the second entry for Germany.  Nevertheless, this is how it operates.

 

I learned about this when I was a volunteer at the now closed genealogy room at the National Archives branch in Pittsfield, MA, in the mid 1990s.

 

You can read more about manifest notations in a blog entry by Stephen Danko, here https://stephendanko.com/blog/1935 and here https://stephendanko.com/blog/268.

 

Stephan Parnes

Great Barrington, MA

 

From: main@... <main@...> On Behalf Of Susan&David
Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 12:29 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Ship Manifest codes #usa

 

These numbers in the last column are a count of the males - females on the passenger list. It is easily confirmed by looking at the column with the heading "Sex" and adding up the males and the females.  At the bottom of the last column there should be a total, e.g.,  16 -11- 27.   It was common to see this on passenger lists of this period.  There must have been a reason for doing this, but I have not seen it explained.

David Rosen, Boston, MA


jel
 

Stephen, David, et al:

Pardon me if this is a duplicate. I sent it previously but have not seen
it appear.
_____________________________________________________________

Thank you all for your replies. When I first read David's reply, it was
obvious that the total on p. 3 of the manifest was the breakdown by sex
of all the passengers on those three pages. That was no mystery. I was
not able to align the individual notations with any category, even with
family groups. These were steerage passengers, so the groups were not in
separate cabins. For my person of interest, on line 8 of p. 1, I know he
traveled alone, and that he was later naturalized in the Southern
District of NY in 1903, which gave weight to the possibility that the
notation represented a naturalization code. The code "1-3", however,
doesn't align with it representing the number of people from Russia --
unless one stretched it to mean that he was 1 + 3 more from Russia.
(There were 4 passengers from Russia on that page and on the list as a
whole.) Thanks to Stephen for the Danko blog links, and to everyone who
weighed in.

Judith Lipmanson