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Double Surname in Belarus Revision List #belarus #general


Steven Usdansky
 

Looking through the Belarus Revision Lists for Siniensky, I was able to find a listing for my great-great grandfather, Feivel (Fayvush in the listing) and his family from dated July, 1874, in Lyubcha. Looks like my great-grandfather and at least one of his sisters were a few years older than they claimed upon entry to the US.  

What's confusing me is the double surnames on the Revision List; the family surname is showing up as "Shliomovich Sinensky." This is the first time I've encountered Shliomovich as part of the surname. It looks like a patronymic, but according to the list, Feivel's father was Iosel, not Shliomo. No father's name is shown for Feivel's wife, Itka. My first thought was perhaps Shliomo was Iosel's father; my second thought was perhaps it was Itka's surname name. However, I'm just guessing with nothing to go on, and thought perhaps someone here might have experience with such names and could advise.


ryabinkym@...
 

In Russia, every man or women got secondary name from father's first name.  In your case "Shliomovich" is his father first name is Shlioma.  And it's no mater for a man or the women.  When your  great-great grandfather will have a daughter name Malka, she will get full name "Malka Shlimovna, when son Motle, he will get full name Motle Shliomovich.
I was called in Belarus, where was born: Michail Matveevich and my father - Matvey


cesar465y@...
 

Hi,

I found something similar in the case of an aunt of my GFather, also from Belarus. Her maiden name was YUDKIN, and she married MERPERT before they moved to Argentina at the 1900's. In various records after they migrated she and their children appear like "MERPERT y YUDKIN" (= Merpert & Yudkin). Someone can explain this?
I found also that he migrated first alone and she and their children did it later. May be this was the reason of the double surname?

Cesar Yeudkin
Israel


Diane Jacobs
 

This is the Spanish way of naming people.
The Y means and.  So they are using both the father's  and mother's surnames. It is not a double surname.

Diane Jacobs 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: cesar465y@...
Date: 6/3/20 12:26 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Double Surname in Belarus Revision List #belarus #general

Hi,

I found something similar in the case of an aunt of my GFather, also from Belarus. Her maiden name was YUDKIN, and she married MERPERT before they moved to Argentina at the 1900's. In various records after they migrated she and their children appear like "MERPERT y YUDKIN" (= Merpert & Yudkin). Someone can explain this?
I found also that he migrated first alone and she and their children did it later. May be this was the reason of the double surname?

Cesar Yeudkin
Israel


--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Steven Usdansky
 

As I mentioned in my post, as shown in the revision list, Fayvush's father was apparently Iosel, not Shliomo. Which is why I'm confused. None of Fayvush's sons are named Shliomo, whereas Fayvush's oldest son was my great-grandfather, Jankel-Josef (possibly named after Fayvush's father).


mbrichman@...
 

On the double surname issue - I agree with the previous post that the record is probably showing the father as having a double name, Ios-Shlioma. But that does not mean the record is correct. I have seen records for a town in Lithuania showing a relative's name as Refuel Michel, whereas his gravestone - and those of his children - all show his name just as Refuel. (He did have a son named Michel.) I recall an article in Avotaynu many years ago showing a similar issue, where names of brothers seemed to be combined into a single individual in 19th century Lithuanian records. This seems to have been common, so it becomes a question of trying to figure out which information is more accurate.
 
Michael Richman


cesar465y@...
 

Diane,

I was born in Argentina and spanish is my mother tongue - I speak, read and write it more than 50 years.
As I know, the use of a double surname was not as extensive as today in Argentina at the beginning of 20th century, also, the common way of adding a surname after edding was "X de Y", not "X y Y" that is more common in Spain. In my research I didn't find other cases like this.
 
But all this is not the real point because my aunt's GF arrived from Belarus with a double surname and she just translated it to Spanish. 

So let's go back to the original question of Steven: perhaps someone here might have experience with such names (not patronimics) and could advise?

Cesar Yeudkin

Israel

 

searching: YEUDKIN/YUDKIN from Belarus

DUGATKIN, KOHON, OSCHEVEROFF 


ryabinkym@...
 

Once more: Shliomovich not a secondary name in many cases it "otchestvo" in Russian.  And Could be sometime a Lust name in a region of Belarus, Poland or Ukraine.  Please give a full sentences where  a "Shliomovich Sinensky" is appear.


paulkozo@...
 

Sometimes you will see "X or Y" for a family name in Revision or Family lists.  Whether an "or" is missing in this case... You may need to look at the original record.  It may help to look at earlier (or even later) lists if available.
--
Paul Hattori
London UK

SHADUR, SADUR, SHADER, SADER, CHADOUR, SADOUR, SHADOUR,  SZADUR from Salakas, Lithuania
MINDEL, MINDELL from Utena and Vyzuonos, Lithuania
FELLER from Pabrade, Lithuania


Karen Lukeman
 

Hi Steven, 

My father's paternal side came from Lyubcha and I have translated revision lists from 1834, 1849, and 1858. I would be happy to email them to you. 

Best regards,  
--
Karen Calmon Lukeman
KALMANOWITZ (Lyubcha and towns near Grodno, Vilna and Minsk)
GOLDSMITH (Bakshty and Ivje)
NASSER (Damascus)
BENBAJI (Damascus)
BALLAS (Damascus)


Bella Tseytlin
 

Hi all, 
 
First of all I should state, that I didn’t work with Belarus Records. Maybe Belarus is  different. 
 
Therefore, I’m not sure if I will confuse the issue or my email will  answer some of the concerns re: Double Surnames.
 
In my far too many encounters into Archival Records, I’ve met with the following statements...Yankel (let’s say) Goldberg and then (either in brackets or not) the following is written also known as such & such, where completely different surname is added to the record.
 
 
 
Hope it helps. 
 
 
 
 
 


Steven Usdansky
 

ryabinkym@...: I have been working under the assumption that Shliomovich Sinensky was a combination of two last names based on the revision list showing the father of Fayvush Shliomovich Sinensky as Iosel.  Michael Richman's comment suggesting that Fayvush's father had a double given name, with one showing up as the father's given name in the revision list, and the other as the patronymic in the surname, is something I never considered, but makes more sense to me than a double surname.


Barbara Krasner
 

I'm going to offer a different perspective. I think in some families two surnames emerged as a result of the adoption of surnames. In my Gurevich family, for instance, some stayed with the name, and others took the name Shavelson after Shevel Gurevich. This was in Belarus. Just something to consider.


mindyoc
 

Please explain what is the Belarus Revision List and how to see it.


Chuck Weinstein
 

Revision Lists were the Russian Empire's version of a census.  They highlighted revisions since the last list.  They were done at irregular intervals during the 19th and early 20th centuries.  Many have been indexed and are on line, but Belarus liswts have not been digitized.

Chuck Weinstein
chuck1@...


patotameister@...
 

Hi!
I'm from Argentina and a lawyer.
The form Surname1 Y Surname2 with the Y (and) between the two surnames is a usual way in the 'declaratorias de herederos' in the inheritances procedures to denote paternal and maternal surnames of the heirs.
Rarely it's used for naming people in real life as was used in Spain in the XIXth centuury.

The double surnames in revision list  of russian ruled territories are quite usual (I have two cases in my family) and denote that the family first took a surname and then take another, so the record with both surnames intended to preserve the data for the future draft of the family's sons.
Also I see two surnames with the partcicle uel or vel that came from Latin and is like and in English. 
Sometimes the double surnames in vital records are there because the mother was present in the moment of the record but not the father, so the clerk quoted the paternal surname between brackets.

Miguel Freixa
Searching for:
KYLIN KILIM FRAJMOWICZ FROJMOWICZ TURNER ZARECKI MANOWICZ NEMIROVSKY ZAJDMAN CHAIT PORTNOY PUMPIANSKY KAPLAN CHERKASSY CHUDNOVSKY DAJCZMAN