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unusual name on tombstone #names


Sandy Levin
 

I am trying to figure out what the father's name on this tombstone might be.  I can read the Hebrew, but the name is not known to me.  Any suggestions?


Corey Brand
 

This intrigued me, so I looked into it. Seems the engraving had a spacing problem. It says the father is Sane haCohen Yelin. Sane (or Sana) is short for Nasan, which would be a Yiddish pronunciation of Natan. In English it would be Nathan.


Marcel Apsel
 

Shmuel Jacob ben Reb Manne Hakohen Yalen


Avrohom Krauss
 

Let me preface my interpretation with a general comment about tombstones. Although engraved in stone, names on tombstones are not always ‘engraved in stone!’ Mistakes do occur. Hebrew names were not always known by survivors or were mangled. Also, engraving mistakes occurred. Often engravers did not know Hebrew and followed the numbers which were translated into Hebrew letters. Letters that are similar were sometimes erroneously substituted. I believe this happened in this case. Allow me to explain.
My guess is that the seemingly long name in question is in fact two words (notice space in between). It appears to me that the first word is the fathers name (Sine); the second, tribal status (HaKohen). If correct, we have to explain some spelling and engraving errors. The father’s name seems to be the Hebrew name ‘Sine’ - samech, yud, nun, yud (Sinai in English) but was misspelled ‘samech, aleph, nun, ayin. (The final letter ‘ayin' could have been used for the Yiddish phonetic spelling-especially if the person was from Galicia). The second word is “HaKohen.”. The clue here is the priestly hands on top of stone. Again, we have to explain the second letter which appears to be a ‘nun’ should be a ‘kaf.’ The letters ’nun’ and ‘kaf' are similar. Take a ‘nun' and widen and it becomes a ‘kaf.’ The next letter appears as a ‘daled’ but should have a little leg under the left side of top to form a ‘heh.’ The final letter that looks like a ‘vav’ should be lengthened to form a final ‘nun.’ There you have it! Shmuel Yaakov ben Sine HaKohen! This is my guess.>

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


Susan&David
 

Looks to me to be Sana followed by the title HaCohen, then YALEN.     The symbol of the open hands giving the priestly blessing is for a descendant of the Cohens the tribe of priests from ancient Israel.  You can find Sana here, in section 3.  a shortened form of Nisan
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/yidnames.htm

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 6/4/2020 9:32 PM, Sandy Levin wrote:

I am trying to figure out what the father's name on this tombstone might be.  I can read the Hebrew, but the name is not known to me.  Any suggestions?



David Shapiro
 

The name seems to be Sanneh סאנע which is short for Nesanel נתנאל. It is followed by the word Hacohen הכהן.

David Shapiro
Jerusalem


marsha.epstein@...
 

Get his death certificate. Might list his father's name.


schwartzeli115@...
 

my theory is that it reads sane Hebrew yalin .but that is just a possibility
it could be that Sana was a nickname for yalin 

Eli Schwartz