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US Naturalization Papers from the Supreme Court #usa #general


Daniela
 

I'm trying to find out what it means when a record says Naturalization: Supreme Court of Washington, DC 1922.

Could this be a naturalization as a result of serving in the military?

How would one get a copy of these papers?

Thanks
Daniela Sciaky

sciakyd@...


Shelley Mitchell
 

After 1906, records of naturalizations in federal courts, including the Supreme Ciurt of Washington, DC, should be in USCIS (US Citizenship and Immigration Services) inventory. Also try Familysearch.org.
--
Shelley Mitchell, NYC    shemit@...
Searching for TERNER, GOLDSCHEIN, KONIGSBERG, SCHONFELD, in Kolomyya; PLATZ, in Delaytn; and TOPF, in Radautz and Kolomea.


Ina Getzoff
 

Daniela:
It probably means that whoever the relative of yours was naturalized in 1922 it occurred in the Supreme Court in Washington, DC. For quite some time people could naturalize in almost any court and then I believe beginning   in the 1920's most of the naturalization began taking place in the Supreme Court of whatever state the person lived in.
 
Hope this helps.
Ina Getzoff
Delray Beach, Florida
 


Herbert Lazerow
 

U.S. law provides that naturalization can be done in any court or by the attorney general. If you are looking for the naturalization of a Philadelphia resident early in the 20th century, there are at least 5 different courts that did numerous naturalizations. As time went on, naturalizations were concentrated in the United States district courts.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law
University of San Diego
lazer@...


David Oseas
 

Unfortunately, the only DC Supreme Court naturalization collection at FamilySearch is an index (not papers themselves) of records from 1802-1909 (https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1130697 ).

If it was a military naturalization, you may be able to find it in Ancestry's "Washington D. C., Military Naturalization Petitions, 1918-1924" collection (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/3034/ ).  Otherwise, you will need to obtain the naturalization papers through NARA or the USCIS Genealogy Program.

Regards,   -David Oseas  Thousand Oaks, CA  <doseas@...>


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"U.S. law provides that naturalization can be done in any court or by the attorney general."
 
This, like most government things - and a lot else - only happened at certain times. We all know that the INS, and its successor now, have universal jurisdiction of naturalizations in the US.
 
I went to Niagara County Hall and asked for my cousin's naturalization papers, the last ones in the Index Book there, in 1906, and they brought them from somewhere and put them in my hand.
 
Things may vary in different states, in the specifics, but in the generalization, it isn't true. Lots of people say, get the Passenger List and look at the Certificate of Arrival, or look at the second page, but either of those is only good for certain, recent years.
 
Things change, and we have to ask the right questions, about certain times and places.  Generalizations generally aren't true.  Even if the person asked about a certain year, it is misleading to answer without specifying.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Marian
 

Sally is right that there's no one answer for all times and places.

It appears the Supreme Court of DC was like a "county court" in Washington DC for some time, including 1922.  A cursory search did not clarify the exact location of its records today.  Because DC isn't a State the jurisdictions can be confusing, and if looking for those records I'd probably start with the National Archives in DC (if they don't have them they should know who does).

Whether a 1922 naturalization could be that of a WW I vet who naturalized under the 1918 military naturalization provisions is a different question, and can't be answered without more information or the actual record.  

Marian Smith


A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniela <sciakyd@...>
I'm trying to find out what it means when a record says Naturalization: Supreme Court of Washington, DC 1922.

Could this be a naturalization as a result of serving in the military?


Yes this person naturalized it says in the Supreme Court of Washington DC.  Search the court on the Internet and find either the clerk or the record room and ask them what the process is for retrieving the document and where they are stored.  The National Archives is making a big effort working even with local courts to scan the old records but if you are not lucky enough to find them online go to the court... it is the simplest route.

There are some special files of military naturalizations bu for the most part unless the person was active in the military at the moment the records are with the local court.  Generally the military exemption simply took you around the waiting periods.  I just worked on one who was naturalized in the federal court in Brooklyn and attached to he application is a letter saying the person had served in the military for a year in 1942 so they were to get immediate naturalization but the record was with the court not the military.  He had been dismissed from the military due to poor health prior to the naturalization.

The naturalization process evolved over time.  Prior to 1906 it was possible to go to the local court or the federal court to go through the process.  So when you are dealing with someone who lived in a city or major metropolitan area you really need to check multiple courts.  

The federal government started to centralize and standardize the naturalization process in 1906 but local courts continued to at least the 1920s also doing naturalizations.  There is a master file in Washington DC at CIS of all the naturalizations in all courts after 1906 but it is costly and time consuming to access and my experience is they have trouble finding the records.  Again start with the local court or the regional NARA offices have most of the federal court records.

One more challenge is that there was no residency requirement so for example someone might have lived in Brooklyn but worked in Manhattan and thought it was simpler to do it in Manhattan and filed there.  Usually it is close to home but it does not have to be.

Also the process was to use a 21st century term portable.  Meaning someone lived in Manhattan and filed first papers.  Then moved to Brooklyn and hence to do his declaration went to the Brooklyn court instead of returning to the Manhattan court.  The Brooklyn court checked the Manhattan records to confirm the first papers had been filed and then took over the process.  I just saw one of these cases where attached to the first papers is a letter between the courts attesting to the records.  When I can I have to go to the second court to find the remainder of the naturalization record.

Hope that helps

Allan Jordan


Marian
 

Okay I don't know why I didn't find this when I looked before, but it would appear the records are at NARA in DC, included within RG 21.  From their catalog (ONLY items that would cover 1922):

NAID 7691865  - “Naturalization Certificate stub index” dating 1906-1926
 
NAID 7692316 - Declarations of Intention to become US citizens 1818-1926
 
NAID 6051624 - Naturalization petitions, 1906-1926
 
NAID 6051621 - Military Petitions for Naturalization, 1918-1924
 
NAID 6051623 - Military naturalization stubs, 1918-1924


Shelley Mitchell
 

After 1906, records of naturalizations in federal courts, including the Supreme Ciurt of Washington, DC, should be in USCIS (US Citizenship and Immigration Services) inventory. Also try Familysearch.org.


--
Shelley Mitchell, NYC    shemit@...
Searching for TERNER, GOLDSCHEIN, KONIGSBERG, SCHONFELD, in Kolomyya; PLATZ, in Delaytn; and TOPF, in Radautz and Kolomea.


Daniela
 

Hi,
Thanks for all this information. Pardon me for asking but how did you find it?

I went to the National Archives website and while I found the search feature, l cannot get the precise files that were found.


I'd just like to know for future searches.

Thanks again.
Daniela Sciaky
sciakyd@...


Marian
 

Hi Daniela,

I found them in the National Archives online Catalog  https://catalog.archives.gov, which is a little different than the National Archives website itself.

At the catalog I searched initially for "Supreme Court of Washington, DC," then narrowed my results to "series" of records.  I opened a few results before finding one showing that exact court name as the "creator" or originator of the records, then clicked on that court name to list all the records of that entity.  In those results I found what appear to be the pertinent records.  I hope that explanation made sense.

Marian Smith