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An Old Song - Possibly Russian, possibly Yiddish #general


de.cantor@...
 

I have a very old and distant memory of my grandfather singing a song with a title that sounded like Toni Godl.  The o in Toni is short and I have failed to find any reference.

He was allegedly from Kiev, Ukraine

This has been nagging away for ages, can anyone enlighten me?

Thanks


avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

Was part of the chorus  "kukirika kukirika+  ...toni go kura ?
If so, that was a song that my father used to sing to me - he was born in Poland in 1896. 
All i remembered was this chorus. Some years ago I sang it to some friends on a kibbutz in Israel and they sang the whole song back to me.
Unfortunately, I do not have it and hope that someone else can send us the words.
The song is about  a rooster crowing in the  morning.  I assume that it is a children's song for waking up in the morning.

Avivah Pinski
                                       


                                              

I have a very old and distant memory of my grandfather singing a song with a title that sounded like Toni Godl.  The o in Toni is short and I have failed to find any reference.

He was allegedly from Kiev, Ukraine

This has been nagging away for ages, can anyone enlighten me?

Thanks


--
Avivah R. Z. Pinski ,  near Philadelphia, USA


Jeff Miller
 

You can find the song on YouTube by Googling the title -- Kukuriku

 

Best regards,

 

Jeff Miller


Kalman Appel
 

This is a song from (I think) modern Israel's earliest agricultural settlement days (maybe 1880's?) Composer and lyricist are unknown.  The words are Hebrew. The words mean, "Wake up lazy boy, and go out to work.  Get up, Get up and go to work.  The rooster has already crowed ' Kukuriku kukuriku'.
 
You can hear it sung by going to this URL
 
If you don't read Hebrew, click on the button to the left of the black bar.  The words are shown in Hebrew but if you press the "Latin" button you will get a transliteration of the lyrics.
 
Have fun!

--
Kalman Appel

Phone    702.466.8248
Skype:   KAL702


Kalman Appel
 

BTW the "words" "toni go kura" and "Toni Godl" are both probably referring to the word "Tarnigol", where the accent is on the last syllable and means "rooster", and "kara" which means crowed or "called out".  "Kukuriku" is, of course, the sound a rooster makes, no?

--
Kalman Appel

Phone    702.466.8248
Skype:   KAL702


de.cantor@...
 

I have listened to the tune of the suggested song on YouTube.  May well be the one however, I am not sure and I am definitely not going to divulge the length of time since I last heard my grandfather sing!

Other memories include 'We're going to a wedding'. - the words may be found here.  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=150434

Another song that I cannot trace is 'Why don't they give a Yiddisher boy a chance?'  It was about the royalty marrying amongst themselves.

I'm trying to record these flashbacks as part of a project to keep the family history alive.

Thanks to all who responded


shirley@...
 

Oh yes!  In Israel/ Hebrew, the rooster says 'Kukuriku' as an American rooster crows 'cock-a-doodle-do'.
 
Shirley Ginzburg
seeking SHLUGER/SCHLAGER from Shepetovka area Ukraine;  descendants from town of DUBNO, Ukraine;  DAMATOVSKY/DEMATOFF from Mir area of Belarus.


Mikhoyel Basherives
 

Moshe Beregovski transcribed a song by ear containing the words or name Tane Godl (as written according to YIVO standards which corresponds to the short a in "toni") in 1928 sung by Sh. Dobin, a scientific worker in Kiev, who learned it from his grandmother in about 1875 in Bobr, Belarus when she was 60 years old. It's the only verse he remembered. I myself think it could very well be a fragment of a long ballad sung centuries before by Jewish troubadours/minnesingers. As Beregovski notes Meylekh means both "king" as well as being a male first name. A Tane as pronounced in Yiddish tav-nun-alef was one of the tanoim, again as pronounced in Yiddish, who were sages during the first two centuries CE whose teachings are included in the Mishnah, so tane-godl (godl is Yiddish for Hebrew gadol) could mean "great teacher". Beregovski wrote that tane-godl means great secret. Beregovski noted that the meaning of the verse is quite obscure. In Mark Slobin's book "Old Jewish Folk Music" reprinting Beregovski's works you can find the music notes. For some reason I sing it often to myself.

The words are:

Meylekh hot geheysn khásene shpiln, khásene shpiln,

me shpilt un me shpilt mit groys gevéyn,

me shpilt un me shpilt mit groys geshréy.

Tane-godls tokhter vil nit Meylekhs zun,

Tane-godls tokhter vil nit Meylekhs zun.


In a loose translation:

Meylekh ordered wedding to be played,

They/We play and play with great weeping,

play and play with great shouting.

Tane-godl's daughter does not want Meylekh's son.