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The male name Shapsei #lithuania #names


Jill Whitehead
 

I am seeking an English equivalent of the first name Shapsei who was the father of Samuel Servian who was a cousin of my grandfather who was also called Samuel Servian (ne Serwianski). Shapsei and his son were born in Kovno in Lithuania, whereas my Servians came from nearby Sejny in Suwalki Gubernia in NE Poland. I have come across Samuel as being a translation of Shapsei, but this seems unlikely as his son was called Samuel. Certain names are repeated in the Servian/Serwianski family (e.g. Mordecai/Max, Josiel/Joseph, Baruch/Barnet, Abraham/Albert, Jacob/Julius) but Shapsei is not one of them - could this be a pet name for another name?

There are several Samuel Servian/Server/Serviansky's (all cousins) in the same generation who lived in variously Liverpool, UK; Middlesbrough, UK (a rabbinical line who came from Vistytis in Lithuania which used to be in Suwalki Gubernia until 1919), Chicago, Pittsburgh, California, Grand Rapids, Toronto and New York. Most have two first names. My grandfather was Samuel Salmon (Solomon), and his Liverpool cousin was Samuel Henry (presumably after Hirsch?). Therefore it is possible Shapsei is one part of a two part name. 

I would be interested to hear if anyone else has a Shapsei in their family and what the English version of the name was most likely to be.

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


David Gordon
 

My father's Hebrew name was Shapsei, or Shopsy (after a great-grandfather named Shabbetai).  His given name was Charles but for almost his whole life he went by Shep.
 
David Gordon
Evanston, IL (USA)


Adam Turner
 

Shapsei (Shopsy, Shepsel, etc.) is a Yiddish form of the Hebrew name Shabbatai.

I have at least four Shabbatai/Shepsels on my tree. The generation they were born in probably influenced the names they went by in English.

The two born before 1880 both went by the name Samuel or Sam.
Another, born in 1903, was a Sidney.
The fourth was born in 1929 and at various times went by the names Salven, Selwyn, or Shep.


Chuck Weinstein
 

My great great grandfather was known in Romania as Shapsie, but when he came to America (1889), he Americanized it to Saul.  His Hebrew name was Shabtai (or Shabsai in Ashkenazic pronunciation).

Chuk Weinstein
Bellport, NY
chuck1@...


Sally Bruckheimer
 

Shapsei, Szabsie often in Polish, is a nickname for Shabatai, like Shabatai Zvi. Nothing special about it, other than that.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


David Lewin
 

At 11:41 11/06/2020, Jill Whitehead via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I am seeking an English equivalent of the first name Shapsei who was
the father of Samuel Servian who was a cousin of my grandfather who
was also called Samuel Servian (ne Serwianski). Shapsei and his son
were born in Kovno in Lithuania, whereas my Servians came from
nearby Sejny in Suwalki Gubernia in NE Poland. I have come across
Samuel as being a translation of Shapsei, but this seems unlikely as
his son was called Samuel. Certain names are repeated in the
Servian/Serwianski family (e.g. Mordecai/Max, Josiel/Joseph,
Baruch/Barnet, Abraham/Albert, Jacob/Julius) but Shapsei is not one
of them - could this be a pet name for another name?

There are several Samuel Servian/Server/Serviansky's (all cousins)
in the same generation who lived in variously Liverpool, UK;
Middlesbrough, UK (a rabbinical line who came from Vistytis in
Lithuania which used to be in Suwalki Gubernia until 1919), Chicago,
Pittsburgh, California, Grand Rapids, Toronto and New York. Most
have two first names. My grandfather was Samuel Salmon (Solomon),
and his Liverpool cousin was Samuel Henry (presumably after
Hirsch?). Therefore it is possible Shapsei is one part of a two part name.

I would be interested to hear if anyone else has a Shapsei in their
family and what the English version of the name was most likely to be.

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK
_._,_._,_

The Hebrew name is Shbtai - derives from Shabbat

David Lewin
London


Malka
 

 

Jill,

I sounds like it may be the Sephardic version of theHebrew name Shab


C Chaykin
 

My father's legal name was Sidney, but his siblings called him Shep or Shepsy. 


Malka
 

 

Hello Jill,

 

It sounds like it may be the Sephardic version of the Hebrew name Shabtai.

Shalom, Malka Chosnek


C Chaykin
 

Perhaps I should mention that the family was Ashkenazi, from Russia, and my father was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1917


Abe
 

My great great uncle, from Suwalki (who emigrated to Sheffield) was named Shepsel Bloch. Shepsel means lamb, but I don't know an equivalent English name.  

Seek the peace of Jerusalem
Abe Lebowitz


C Chaykin
 

You just reminded me...  My dad Sidney's "alternate" name was indeed Shepsel, but he was also called Shep or Shepsy. Only his siblings and very close acquaintances (friendships made in childhood) used these names. To everyone else, including me, he was Sidney. Thank you, Abe!


Sally Bruckheimer
 

A cousin of mine, Shapsie in Yiddish, became Sidney in English. But it could be anything; Sam was popular.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Sheldon Clare
 

I had an uncle in Argentina whose Hebrew name was Shapseh. His Argentinian name was Salvador!!


Michael Snyder (JewishGen)
 

My brother's hebrew name is Shabsi. His name is Sheppard (Shep). He was named for my Geat-Uncle Sheppard, who was named for Shabsa Oks of Volynia in present day Ukraine.


Moshe Davis
 

The origin of the name Shabsai (Ashkenazi pronuciation) or Shabtai (Sefardi pronunciation) is Biblical - see Ezra 10:15, Nechemia 11:16
Shabsai HaLevi was apparently an important enough individual to be mentioned as helping to organize those who returned to the land of Israel from the Babylonian exile.

My wife's father was Shabtai. We have a son Shabsai. In the family there are a series of descendents named in alternating generations Shabtai the son of Moshe or Moshe the son of Shabtai. There are thus a number of parallel cousins named either Shabtai or Moshe. The family are Sefardim from Istanbul by way of Cuba, originally probably descended from exiles of the Spanish expulsion of 1492. In Cuba he went by Sabeto. After arriving in the USA in the mid-1950s, he went by Robert (because of the English resemblance to Sabeto). Most of the family members today live in Michigan, Florida, and Israel.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem


On Thu, 11 Jun 2020 at 14:42, Jill Whitehead via groups.jewishgen.org <jill.whitehead=blueyonder.co.uk@...> wrote:
I am seeking an English equivalent of the first name Shapsei who was the father of Samuel Servian who was a cousin of my grandfather who was also called Samuel Servian (ne Serwianski). Shapsei and his son were born in Kovno in Lithuania, whereas my Servians came from nearby Sejny in Suwalki Gubernia in NE Poland. I have come across Samuel as being a translation of Shapsei, but this seems unlikely as his son was called Samuel. Certain names are repeated in the Servian/Serwianski family (e.g. Mordecai/Max, Josiel/Joseph, Baruch/Barnet, Abraham/Albert, Jacob/Julius) but Shapsei is not one of them - could this be a pet name for another name?

There are several Samuel Servian/Server/Serviansky's (all cousins) in the same generation who lived in variously Liverpool, UK; Middlesbrough, UK (a rabbinical line who came from Vistytis in Lithuania which used to be in Suwalki Gubernia until 1919), Chicago, Pittsburgh, California, Grand Rapids, Toronto and New York. Most have two first names. My grandfather was Samuel Salmon (Solomon), and his Liverpool cousin was Samuel Henry (presumably after Hirsch?). Therefore it is possible Shapsei is one part of a two part name. 

I would be interested to hear if anyone else has a Shapsei in their family and what the English version of the name was most likely to be.

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


tamama2e@...
 

My Great Great Grandfather was Szapsaj Zylberstzejn.   His Hebrew name (known from his son's grave ) was Shabtai.
Shabtai/Sapse/Szapsz/Szapsaj) שבתי Zylbersztejn זילבערשטיין
 He was married a woman from Wasoz - the Lewandowska family, and later died in Szuzcyn both in Lomza Gubernia  a neighboring Gubernia to Suwalki


Jill Whitehead
 

Thanks for all your comments. I was taken by Moshe Davis's example of Robert. I read that Bob Dylan's hebrew name was Shabtai. (My) Samuel Servian's sister's eldest son was called Reuben, which later became Robert when he emigrated to the USA from Liverpool in 1907.  Whether he was named after Shapsei I do not know. Also equally possible, Samuel's brother Abraham/Albert named his youngest son Sidney, which may be more likely.

Jill Whitehead, 


Peter Wiesner
 

The original first name of my grandfather, Steve Krotoczynski, who was born in Kleczew Poland, was Czapse, which appears to be a variant of Shapsei.  When he emigrated to America and then to England, he assumed "Steve" as his first name.  Later he lived in Berlin, Germany and used the German equivalent of Steve, "Stephan." I don't know about the connection between "Czapse" given at birth and his later assumed names. 

Peter Wiesner, Newtown, PA USA


@murfisto
 

Shepsie: Possibly the diminutive of the name: Shepsel. My first cousin, born near Bialystok, emigrated to Montreal in 1939 and never changed his Yiddish name up to when he took his own life. I heard him called Shepsie by his mother and older brothers.