synagogue memorial plaques #JewishGenUpdates


itsdikka@...
 

My religious school students copied the names and dates on the memorial plaques in the synagogue.  I remember that there is a push to record this information somewhere.  Can somebody tell me what group collects that information and how I should send the data to them.


Max Heffler
 

Nolan Altman

Memorial Plaques Database Coordinator

NAltman@...



From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of itsdikka via groups.jewishgen.org <itsdikka=gmail.com@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 7:36 AM
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: [JewishGen.org] synagogue memorial plaques #JewishGenUpdates
 
My religious school students copied the names and dates on the memorial plaques in the synagogue.  I remember that there is a push to record this information somewhere.  Can somebody tell me what group collects that information and how I should send the data to them.

--

Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


Nolan Altman
 

If anyone is interested, I have a letter drafted to synagogue administrators explaining the purpose and goal of our Memorial Plaques Database and how they can help.  Please see the attached and modify as needed.

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@... 


Nolan Altman
 

There were two typos in the first uploaded letter.  Please use this revised one.

I apologize for any inconvenience.

Nolan


Peter Cohen
 

When I raised this proposal at my synagogue, there was some resistance that it was a privacy violation.  I have encountered similar objections when photographing gravestones. In the the case of gravestones, my response is that after literally setting something in stone and displaying it in a public place, it is unreasonable to expect the information thereon to be private.  But, one could make the argument that synagogue memorial plaques are not in the same category.  Has anyone else encountered this objection, and how did you address it?

Peter Cohen


Nolan Altman
 

Hi Peter,

Although I don't think there is a legal privacy issue with either, I can see the argument reversed.  The cemeteries are usually private cemeteries so the administrators may ask you to leave if they see a researcher taking a significant number of photos.  However, memorial plaques are usually placed out in the open in the sanctuary where not only members, but visitors who may be attending weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs or other events are free to walk over and read them.  That hardly seems like a way to safeguard data if there was a privacy concern.

The best way to capture information would be to approach the cemetery or synagogue administrators and explain what you want to do and why.  To that end, feel free to use the attached letter which may help.

Nolan Altman
JOWBR & Memorial Plaques Database Coordinator
nta@... 


Matt Friedman
 

If it is an invasion of privacy, don’t put up a yahrzeit plaque. The whole idea of a memorial wall is visibility, sharing and remembrance.

Matt Friedman


Max Heffler
 

During the week of my father’s shiva I went to a number of local synagogues and 2 of 3 welcomed me and the 3rd denied me.

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of peter.cohen via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Friday, June 12, 2020 12:58 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] synagogue memorial plaques #JewishGenUpdates

 

When I raised this proposal at my synagogue, there was some resistance that it was a privacy violation.  I have encountered similar objections when photographing gravestones. In the the case of gravestones, my response is that after literally setting something in stone and displaying it in a public place, it is unreasonable to expect the information thereon to be private.  But, one could make the argument that synagogue memorial plaques are not in the same category.  Has anyone else encountered this objection, and how did you address it?

Peter Cohen


--

Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


peggyfreedman@...
 

When I asked to do this about five years ago, the synagogue board turned the project down over privacy concerns. We had volunteers and were ready to go, but apparently a few board members were concerned that it was an invasion of privacy.  T

Peggy Freedman


Nurit Har-zvi
 

Hello,

The letter to synagogues refers to an attached spreadsheet but I don't see one. Is that a separate download?

Nurit Har-zvi
famhisthz@...


Ann Hellman
 

There is a template, Here is the link. Thank you for wanting to contribute.
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/MemorialPlaquesTemplate.xls
Ann Meddin Hellman
Charleston SC


Nolan Altman
 

Hi Nurit,

The spreadsheet can be downloaded from https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm  (I've attached a copy to this posting.)

BTW...if the synagogue has a digital listing of their memorial plaques and/or yizkor lists, I can probably help to reformat the entire list without anyone having to do any re-keying.

You can contact me at NAltman@... 

Nolan


peter isert
 

I think it’s a wonderful idea to help trace loved ones & to keep in touch with family members long forgotten. I agree with Matt, if you want to keep it private, don’t place the plaques in a public area for all to see. Peter Isert, Sydney, Australia 


Carol
 

I love the interest in this subject!  When I was doing the plaques in Massachusetts, I sometimes ran into privacy concerns, but only once had a rabbi refuse to let us come and photograph.  I told hm that was fine if he wanted to be the only shul in the state without its plaques on line.  Eventually he relented.  But i always told people that the information on the plaques (except the Hebrew name) were a matter of public record, and that satisfied them.  I do know that Mass. is far more liberal about access to vital records than many other states.


Lee Jaffe
 

I was the privacy officer at my university library and I can tell you that, in legal terms, privacy protection applies to only specific pieces of personal identity information in combination.  I doubt memorial boards include social security numbers, street address or anything else that might be protected.  That synagogue administrations might be uncomfortable with info being collected and you may be limited by their refusal, it should be clear that there is no legal privacy requirement.

Lee Jaffe