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Naming pattern - TURKUS #general


Elaine Farran
 

While researching my Turkus ancestry, I noted an interesting series of names which seems odd for Ashkenazi Jews.
 
These are the names and their relationship to me -
5th  ggrandfather     ELIASZ Turkus
4th  ggrandfather  - DAWID ELIASZ Turkus
Dawid's son - Ahron DAVID Turkus; Dawid's daughter Szosza was my 3rd great-grandmother 
 
Would this repetition of names be an acceptable pattern for Ashkenazi Jews?
 
Many thanks
Elaine Farran
Researching: TURKUS, MUSZKATBLAT, HORSZTEIN/GORSTEIN/GORENSTEIN, Warsaw 

 


Sue Frank
 

My understanding is that patronymics were commonly used until about the mid 19th century among Ashkenazi Jews. However there does seem to be a difference here in that one of my ancestors was Iciek Leibkovich Rosenberg (so, son of Leib), whereas yours don’t appear to have the “kovich” suffix. Maybe this has something to do with the naming custom in the region where they originated rather than where they were living at the time. 
It’s curious, though, and not a common surname either, I don’t think. Is there any family rumour that they may have originated in more southern parts of Europe. Any DNA clues?

Sue Frank
Researching: ROSENBERG, SKOWRONEK, CHENCINER, Warsaw and Serock. 


On 24 Jun 2020, at 02:55, Elaine Farran via groups.jewishgen.org <elainefarran=yahoo.com@...> wrote:


While researching my Turkus ancestry, I noted an interesting series of names which seems odd for Ashkenazi Jews.
 
These are the names and their relationship to me -
5th  ggrandfather     ELIASZ Turkus
4th  ggrandfather  - DAWID ELIASZ Turkus
Dawid's son - Ahron DAVID Turkus; Dawid's daughter Szosza was my 3rd great-grandmother 
 
Would this repetition of names be an acceptable pattern for Ashkenazi Jews?
 
Many thanks
Elaine Farran
Researching: TURKUS, MUSZKATBLAT, HORSZTEIN/GORSTEIN/GORENSTEIN, Warsaw 

 


--
Cambridgeshire, UK

Surnames: ROSENBERG, SKOWRONEK, CHENCINER, HERSZENKRUG from Warsaw


Rodney Eisfelder
 

Elaine,
This naming pattern (given name followed by patronym) was absolutely standard among Ashkenazi Jews before surnames were introduced.
In Eastern Europe the patronym was generally "decorated" by -ovitch or similar. In Hebrew, it was prefixed by ben or bat, but in German speaking countries the patronym was generally undecorated. Many families continued to use patronyms as middle names long after the introduction of surnames in the early 19th century. One famous example is the Orthodox Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch. While wikipedia says his father was Mendel Hirsch*, geni.com says his father was Raphael Aryeh Hirsch. So in the rabbi's name, Raphael was a patronym.

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia
*At least one of sources cited by wikipedia is a family tree that supports the geni.com version.


avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

ELIAS is a very common Sephardic name and is found amongst Greek Jews in particular.  Just try googling the name
or check any of the genealogy web sites.  Turkus also appears to be a Sephardic name or possibly an Eastern European
surname for someone from Turkey. Many of the Jews who left Spain went to Greece and Turkey. 
Some of them then moved into Eastern Europe. Your ancestors may well have been Sephardic Jews. 
There is a group specifically for Sephardic Jews in Europe - it might be worth getting in touch with them. .

In addition, has anyone in the family tested DNA?  In your situation, DNA testing might be very helpful. If you plan to test,
make sure that you pick the DNA organization that will be most helpful in this.

Avivah Pinski
near Philadelphia, USA
 

--
Avivah R. Z. Pinski ,  near Philadelphia, USA