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What "notions" means? #general


C Chaykin
 

To Nicole....  There's an interesting UK/North American lexical difference:

haberdashery

 

  • 1North American Men's clothing and accessories.

 

 

  • 2BritishSmall items used in sewing, such as buttons, zippers, and thread; notions.

 


Deanna Levinsky
 

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 06:39 PM, Nicole Heymans wrote:
I hadn't previously come across this meaning of "notions". In the UK these items are "haberdashery".

"England and America are two great nations separated by a common language". (G.B. Shaw).
 
Nicole Heymans

Le sam. 27 juin 2020 à 19:25, Laurie Sosna <lsmacgeek@...> a écrit :

Notions has a very special meaning for me.

 

In the early 1990s, I was a videographer for the Holocaust Oral History Project in San Francisco..

One day, a man arrived for his interview, accompanied by his wife. She sat off to the side quietly as we interviewed her husband. 

 

After his interview was over, he said that we should interview his wife, she was a survivor too.
She said that she wasn’t in a concentration camp, it wasn’t a very interesting story. We explained that every story mattered. I used the example of a George Seurat painting: Every dot of paint contributed the detail and nuance of the final image. She agreed to talk to us.

 

She was born in 1930 in Poland. Her family was deported to what she called a gulag, possibly in Russia. She remembers it was always cold, they were always hungry, supplies were hard to come by. But they could write letters. Her mother wrote to anyone she could think of, asking for help. One day, a package arrived from America. On the box was written the word “Notions.” The guards let it pass through, as it wasn’t worth anything to them. It was filled with needles, thread, buttons, zippers, elastic, snaps and hooks. She said that box saved their lives. It allowed them repair their clothes. A hook or a piece of elastic could keep your coat or sleeve closed against the cold.  And they could barter: trade a needle and thread for food.

 

As she told us the story, I flashed on a cupboard in our kitchen when I was little. On a shelf was my mother’s sewing kit, filled with spools of thread, needles, hooks, snaps.
Next to the kit was a glass jar filled with buttons, saved from worn out clothes. We used those buttons to play driedel, the sparkly ones from coats were worth more than the simple shirt buttons. 

And then I realized she was born the same year as my mother.

 

No other survivor story affected me as profoundly as hers. It connected something from my life to something from hers.
Every time I sew on a button or stitch up a loose hem, there she is.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco

 

 


 On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 06:39 PM, Nicole Heymans wrote:
I hadn't previously come across this meaning of "notions". In the UK these items are "haberdashery".

"England and America are two great nations separated by a common language". (G.B. Shaw).
 
Nicole Heymans

Le sam. 27 juin 2020 à 19:25, Laurie Sosna <lsmacgeek@...> a écrit :

Notions has a very special meaning for me.

 

In the early 1990s, I was a videographer for the Holocaust Oral History Project in San Francisco..

One day, a man arrived for his interview, accompanied by his wife. She sat off to the side quietly as we interviewed her husband. 

 

After his interview was over, he said that we should interview his wife, she was a survivor too.
She said that she wasn’t in a concentration camp, it wasn’t a very interesting story. We explained that every story mattered. I used the example of a George Seurat painting: Every dot of paint contributed the detail and nuance of the final image. She agreed to talk to us.

 

She was born in 1930 in Poland. Her family was deported to what she called a gulag, possibly in Russia. She remembers it was always cold, they were always hungry, supplies were hard to come by. But they could write letters. Her mother wrote to anyone she could think of, asking for help. One day, a package arrived from America. On the box was written the word “Notions.” The guards let it pass through, as it wasn’t worth anything to them. It was filled with needles, thread, buttons, zippers, elastic, snaps and hooks. She said that box saved their lives. It allowed them repair their clothes. A hook or a piece of elastic could keep your coat or sleeve closed against the cold.  And they could barter: trade a needle and thread for food.

 

As she told us the story, I flashed on a cupboard in our kitchen when I was little. On a shelf was my mother’s sewing kit, filled with spools of thread, needles, hooks, snaps.
Next to the kit was a glass jar filled with buttons, saved from worn out clothes. We used those buttons to play driedel, the sparkly ones from coats were worth more than the simple shirt buttons. 

And then I realized she was born the same year as my mother.

 

No other survivor story affected me as profoundly as hers. It connected something from my life to something from hers.
Every time I sew on a button or stitch up a loose hem, there she is.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco

 

 


 On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 06:39 PM, Nicole Heymans wrote:
I hadn't previously come across this meaning of "notions". In the UK these items are "haberdashery".

"England and America are two great nations separated by a common language". (G.B. Shaw).
 
Nicole Heymans

Le sam. 27 juin 2020 à 19:25, Laurie Sosna <lsmacgeek@...> a écrit :

Notions has a very special meaning for me.

 

In the early 1990s, I was a videographer for the Holocaust Oral History Project in San Francisco..

One day, a man arrived for his interview, accompanied by his wife. She sat off to the side quietly as we interviewed her husband. 

 

After his interview was over, he said that we should interview his wife, she was a survivor too.
She said that she wasn’t in a concentration camp, it wasn’t a very interesting story. We explained that every story mattered. I used the example of a George Seurat painting: Every dot of paint contributed the detail and nuance of the final image. She agreed to talk to us.

 

She was born in 1930 in Poland. Her family was deported to what she called a gulag, possibly in Russia. She remembers it was always cold, they were always hungry, supplies were hard to come by. But they could write letters. Her mother wrote to anyone she could think of, asking for help. One day, a package arrived from America. On the box was written the word “Notions.” The guards let it pass through, as it wasn’t worth anything to them. It was filled with needles, thread, buttons, zippers, elastic, snaps and hooks. She said that box saved their lives. It allowed them repair their clothes. A hook or a piece of elastic could keep your coat or sleeve closed against the cold.  And they could barter: trade a needle and thread for food.

 

As she told us the story, I flashed on a cupboard in our kitchen when I was little. On a shelf was my mother’s sewing kit, filled with spools of thread, needles, hooks, snaps.
Next to the kit was a glass jar filled with buttons, saved from worn out clothes. We used those buttons to play driedel, the sparkly ones from coats were worth more than the simple shirt buttons. 

And then I realized she was born the same year as my mother.

 

No other survivor story affected me as profoundly as hers. It connected something from my life to something from hers.
Every time I sew on a button or stitch up a loose hem, there she is.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco

 

 

Here haberdashery was generally for men’s hats and ties and small accessories 
 
--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


Nicole Heymans
 

I hadn't previously come across this meaning of "notions". In the UK these items are "haberdashery".

"England and America are two great nations separated by a common language". (G.B. Shaw).

Nicole Heymans


Le sam. 27 juin 2020 à 19:25, Laurie Sosna <lsmacgeek@...> a écrit :

Notions has a very special meaning for me.

 

In the early 1990s, I was a videographer for the Holocaust Oral History Project in San Francisco..

One day, a man arrived for his interview, accompanied by his wife. She sat off to the side quietly as we interviewed her husband. 

 

After his interview was over, he said that we should interview his wife, she was a survivor too.
She said that she wasn’t in a concentration camp, it wasn’t a very interesting story. We explained that every story mattered. I used the example of a George Seurat painting: Every dot of paint contributed the detail and nuance of the final image. She agreed to talk to us.

 

She was born in 1930 in Poland. Her family was deported to what she called a gulag, possibly in Russia. She remembers it was always cold, they were always hungry, supplies were hard to come by. But they could write letters. Her mother wrote to anyone she could think of, asking for help. One day, a package arrived from America. On the box was written the word “Notions.” The guards let it pass through, as it wasn’t worth anything to them. It was filled with needles, thread, buttons, zippers, elastic, snaps and hooks. She said that box saved their lives. It allowed them repair their clothes. A hook or a piece of elastic could keep your coat or sleeve closed against the cold.  And they could barter: trade a needle and thread for food.

 

As she told us the story, I flashed on a cupboard in our kitchen when I was little. On a shelf was my mother’s sewing kit, filled with spools of thread, needles, hooks, snaps.
Next to the kit was a glass jar filled with buttons, saved from worn out clothes. We used those buttons to play driedel, the sparkly ones from coats were worth more than the simple shirt buttons. 

And then I realized she was born the same year as my mother.

 

No other survivor story affected me as profoundly as hers. It connected something from my life to something from hers.
Every time I sew on a button or stitch up a loose hem, there she is.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco


Laurie Sosna
 

Notions has a very special meaning for me.

 

In the early 1990s, I was a videographer for the Holocaust Oral History Project in San Francisco..

One day, a man arrived for his interview, accompanied by his wife. She sat off to the side quietly as we interviewed her husband. 

 

After his interview was over, he said that we should interview his wife, she was a survivor too.
She said that she wasn’t in a concentration camp, it wasn’t a very interesting story. We explained that every story mattered. I used the example of a George Seurat painting: Every dot of paint contributed the detail and nuance of the final image. She agreed to talk to us.

 

She was born in 1930 in Poland. Her family was deported to what she called a gulag, possibly in Russia. She remembers it was always cold, they were always hungry, supplies were hard to come by. But they could write letters. Her mother wrote to anyone she could think of, asking for help. One day, a package arrived from America. On the box was written the word “Notions.” The guards let it pass through, as it wasn’t worth anything to them. It was filled with needles, thread, buttons, zippers, elastic, snaps and hooks. She said that box saved their lives. It allowed them repair their clothes. A hook or a piece of elastic could keep your coat or sleeve closed against the cold.  And they could barter: trade a needle and thread for food.

 

As she told us the story, I flashed on a cupboard in our kitchen when I was little. On a shelf was my mother’s sewing kit, filled with spools of thread, needles, hooks, snaps.
Next to the kit was a glass jar filled with buttons, saved from worn out clothes. We used those buttons to play driedel, the sparkly ones from coats were worth more than the simple shirt buttons. 

And then I realized she was born the same year as my mother.

 

No other survivor story affected me as profoundly as hers. It connected something from my life to something from hers.
Every time I sew on a button or stitch up a loose hem, there she is.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco


C Chaykin
 

The term "notions" is used for sewing accessories like buttons, snaps, etc. Here's a link to a wiki. 


Deanna Levinsky
 

Notions used to mean sewing supplies, craft supplies and other small items women used. At that time most clothing was made at home or by a local seamstress so trimmings for a dress or hat or yarn to knit a sweater were bought from a store that sold “notions”
Also there was a notions section in department stores
Deanna Mandel Levinsky 
Long Island New York 
--
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


Ilya Zeldes
 

In 1893-1903, in several editions of a City Directory, the occupation of a particular person was listed as "carpenter", then "grocer", and in the last listing "notions". No question about carpenter and grocer, but what the "notions" could mean in the context of occupation?