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"Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany


Diane Jacobs
 

We probably read most of the same  books
As I remember reading all you mentioned except the Five Little Peppers.

Diane Jacobs



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Renee Steinig <genmaven@...>
Date: 7/1/20 7:43 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] "Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany

My experience was quite different. My parents, working class refugees
from Europe, outfitted my room with a bookcase, which first held slim
"Golden Books" -- e.g. "Poky Little Puppy." Later reading included a
number of children's books published in the 1800s: "Grimm's Fairy
Tales" (pub. 1812), "Little Women" (pub. 1868), "Black Beauty" (pub.
1877), "Heidi" (pub. 1881), and "The Five Little Peppers and How They
Grew" (pub. 1881). And then of course there was the Nancy Drew
detective series (inspiration for later genealogical sleuthing? :-)

Going beyond personal experiences, please note that the American
Antiquarian Society's Children's Literature collection
(https://www.americanantiquarian.org/children.htm) includes over
26,000 volumes -- all published by 1900.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

Elaine Kirsh <troyfamily@...> wrote:

<<I was born in 1944 in NJ to a family that valued education yet I had
few books. I understand that this was true for most people. I can’t
believe there were children’s books in the 1800’s!>>
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Renee Steinig
 

My experience was quite different. My parents, working class refugees
from Europe, outfitted my room with a bookcase, which first held slim
"Golden Books" -- e.g. "Poky Little Puppy." Later reading included a
number of children's books published in the 1800s: "Grimm's Fairy
Tales" (pub. 1812), "Little Women" (pub. 1868), "Black Beauty" (pub.
1877), "Heidi" (pub. 1881), and "The Five Little Peppers and How They
Grew" (pub. 1881). And then of course there was the Nancy Drew
detective series (inspiration for later genealogical sleuthing? :-)

Going beyond personal experiences, please note that the American
Antiquarian Society's Children's Literature collection
(https://www.americanantiquarian.org/children.htm) includes over
26,000 volumes -- all published by 1900.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

Elaine Kirsh <troyfamily@...> wrote:

<<I was born in 1944 in NJ to a family that valued education yet I had
few books. I understand that this was true for most people. I can’t
believe there were children’s books in the 1800’s!>>


Diane Jacobs
 

And we used the local library for many of our nooks.

Diane Jacobs 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Deanna Levinsky <DEANNASMAC@...>
Date: 7/1/20 2:02 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] "Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany

Concerning children’s books-1744 was the first children’s/picture book 
I was born in the late 1930’s and had plenty of picture and story books 
The depression and war years put a crimp on the availability of books in general and during and right after WWII paper might have been scarce 
That said, books were shared from one family to another
Deanna Levinsky
Long Island, New York
--
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Deanna Levinsky
 

Concerning children’s books-1744 was the first children’s/picture book 
I was born in the late 1930’s and had plenty of picture and story books 
The depression and war years put a crimp on the availability of books in general and during and right after WWII paper might have been scarce 
That said, books were shared from one family to another
Deanna Levinsky
Long Island, New York
--
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


ELAINE KIRSH
 

I was born in 1944 in NJ to a family that valued education yet I had few books. I understand that this was true for most people. I can’t believe there were children’s books in the 1800’s!
Elaine Kirsh


Michael Rubin
 

I have the estate inventory of an ancestor who died in 1832 in a small village in Hessen-Nassau. The inventory lists several obviously Jewish books (eg. "ein Judisches Gesetzbuch").  It also lists "2 Osterbücher."  I know that this term today means springtime children's books and/or secular books somewhat related to Easter themes such as bunnies and generally neutral in terms of religious content.  My question is what this term might have meant in 1832. I have a hard time believing it refers to today's version especially since this person was elderly and children were out of the house.  And, there were only two such books.  There were only one or two of any of the books in the house.
Could Osterbücher have meant haggadah for Passover?  Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Michael Rubin
Boston, MA USA