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Chicago repeat marriage in mid 20th C. #usa #general


Hanna Grossman
 

Can someone make a suggestion as to why my 4th cousin once removed, Max KIRCHHEIMER (KIRK) who said in his citizenship papers that he married Alice FREUDENTHAL in Chicago on 12 Nov 1938, whose 1940 census shows him living as married with Alice, her parents, siblings and their baby, should show up in a Cook County marriage index as marrying her on 27 Oct 1950?



What reason might there be for marrying the same person again? There is no indication that they were divorced in between.

Hanna Grossman, Arlington, VA


Sherri Bobish
 


Hi Hanna,

Did you ever find a record of the 12 Nov 1938 marriage in Chicago?

If not, perhaps they married in 1938 with a religious ceremony, but not a civil license?

If that is the case, maybe in 1950 there was a reason they needed to show a civil marriage record.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ



avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

Maybe they had a religious marriage in 1938 and did not have a civil marriage until 1950.   This was common in Eastern Europe, although your example is in the US. 
Another possibility is that they thought they were common law married.  However, in spite of the general idea that people were common law married after living together for a period of time, there are
specific requirements for a common law marriage.  Illinois abolished common law marriage in 1905.  Perhaps this couple thought that they were common law married and, when they discovered that
they were not, they decided to legalize the relationship.  For example, you cannot collect social security on a partner's account  if you are not legally married.  

There are a few states that still have legal common law marriage.  Pennsylvania abolished common law marriage in 2005, but any common law marriage occurring before that time is still recognized. 
Pennsylvania has replaced common law marriage, probably because of Quaker tradition which has no religious leaders, with a marriage certificate that does not require someone to officiate. 

Avivah Pinski, Attorney at Law
near Philadelphia


Chicago repeat marriage in mid 20th C.
#general #usa
From: Hanna Grossman
Date: Sat, 04 Jul 2020 20:48:52 EDT

Can someone make a suggestion as to why my 4th cousin once removed, Max KIRCHHEIMER (KIRK) who said in his citizenship papers that he married Alice FREUDENTHAL in Chicago on 12 Nov 1938, whose 1940 census shows him living as married with Alice, her parents, siblings and their baby, should show up in a Cook County marriage index as marrying her on 27 Oct 1950?

What reason might there be for marrying the same person again? There is no indication that they were divorced in between.

Hanna Grossman, Arlington, VA

 

 

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Tel. 610-649-4819
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Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

I am not sure that my cousin's situation is the same but: My first
cousin married a non-jewish woman (I think in Nevada). After a while
they were married religiously by a reform Rabbi and eventually (a
third time) by an Orthodox Rabbi. So she joked to me how she was
married to my cousin 3 times.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Marjorie Geiser
 

I actually found the same thing for my g-grandparents. I have their marriage record in Poland, in 1895, immigrated in 1906, he naturalized in 1922, and they got married again in 1927. I'm not clear WHY.
 
Margie
Arizona, USA

LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/ZYLBERNAGEL/SILVER, EPSTEJN/EPSTEIN, MOCZYDLOWER/MOCHEDLOVER, ERLICH, GRUNPELTZ, JOSKOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN, SZTABINSKA, WILK


Lin Mor
 

Hi Hannah, I am sure that no two or more, situations are the same, but sometimes a misunderstanding happens. My maternal grandparents are on record to have received a marriage license in Erie PA in April, 1908. I am quite sure that they had a religious ceremony, possibly a few months before, because Grandma was about 3 months pregnant in April.  Perhaps they though it wise to also have a civil marriage record, but the signed civil/legal paperwork was never returned to City Hall. According to civil law, then, the marriage did not take place.  I attribute it to ignorance as well as perhaps a language barrier as to how it all needed to be done. My suggestion is that you can check to see if a marriage license was issued in 1938, the people in Erie PA found the license issuance easy to find in their records.


Bob Silverstein
 

Hi Hanna,

I do not know how much of the information in the various naturalization forms were either confirmed by the naturalizing agencies or required the applicants to show proof.  Max could have claimed and sworn to the marriage without needing to prove it.  We know the censuses are self-reporting and unverified so the 1940 does not prove anything.  Something may have come up that prompted them to make it official in 1950.  


Frank Schulaner
 

Perhaps not really relevant, but would've seemed so to me years ago when I was the Haggadah's "Too young to understand things." I was confused by two gravestones with the same female name, and dates not all that different (as if older and younger sisters) near my father's father's stone--one of those two stones (or I exaggerate this?) noticeably more distant from my grandfather's stone.

Our grandfather married and buried  the same woman twice?

My older, wiser cousin explained:  The closer stone was the first wife's, our grandmother's, who died before her time. Since he and our future uncles and aunts--imagine them squalling--needed someone to care for them, our grandfather re-married relatively quickly. Our grandmother and "the other" just happened to have the same name.


cohen.izzy@...
 

Yes. Something similar happened to me. I was born in April 1937 but my birth was not recorded until almost 3 years later in February 1940. The doctor who delivered me by cesarean section simply failed to record my birth.

In the case of your relative, they probably needed to produce a marriage certificate in 1950 and discovered their marriage had not been recorded by whoever conducted it (probably a rabbi). So the least expensive solution was to get married again, perhaps in a private ceremony conducted by some county official.


Bob Silverstein
 

I have the same thing in my family.  A relative with two wives with the same first name.  If the headstones have the women's father's names, then you would have seen they were two different ladies.  Likewise, a search of documents could show them to be different.