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navy emblem on gravestone? #general

tom
 

i was surprised to find this emblem, crossed anchors and a shield under an eagle, which i think is navy, on a relative’s gravestone in texas.  

there are similar symbols online, as naval officers’ badges, but i found no records to indicate that he served in the navy, just a draft card and a medical discharge for a non-com infantryman with a similar name.  and i don’t know what the feather next to it means.  any suggestions?


....... tom klein, toronto

Kenneth Ryesky
 

Sometimes the symbols and devices on grave markers (and memorial plaques) represent some sort of preference or quirk of the decedent (or ascribed to the decedent by one or more survivors).

My sister, for example, had this thing about butterflies.  She had butterfly themes in her clothing, jewelry, and home decor, and even in one of her e-mail addresses.  So when a close friend of hers suggested that a butterfly be placed on her grave marker, my Mom and I readily acquiesced.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/128696317

--
Ken Ryesky,  Petach Tikva, Israel     kenneth.ryesky@...

Friedman, H George
 

"i was surprised to find this emblem, crossed anchors and a shield under an eagle, which i think is navy, on a relative’s gravestone in texas.

"there are similar symbols online, as naval officers’ badges, but i found no records to indicate that he served in the navy, just a draft card and a medical discharge for a non-com infantryman with a similar name. and i don’t know what the feather next to it means. any suggestions?

"....... tom klein, toronto"

Tom, have you checked for U. S. Coast Guard connections? A lot of CG symbols also feature the crossed anchors and shield.

George Friedman
Champaign, Illinois

Susan&David
 

Navy.  You can google "Eagle Shield and Anchor"   I don't see anything about a feather.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 7/12/2020 11:51 PM, tom wrote:
i was surprised to find this emblem, crossed anchors and a shield under an eagle, which i think is navy, on a relative’s gravestone in texas.  

there are similar symbols online, as naval officers’ badges, but i found no records to indicate that he served in the navy, just a draft card and a medical discharge for a non-com infantryman with a similar name.  and i don’t know what the feather next to it means.  any suggestions?


....... tom klein, toronto


Jx. Gx.
 

Tom,

The anchors, shield, and eagle make it a navy symbol.  I would do some more checking with the National Personnel Records Center about his military status. During WWI in the UK, anyone who didn't sign up for military service was publicly shamed by being handed a white feather.  To add further insult this act, it was usually done by women.  I don't know if this shaming was carried over into WWII and if your relative was in the UK or one of its colonial countries at that time.

If your relative lived in the U.S. during WWII and especially if he was outside a large city, many community newspapers published notices about men enlisting in the military and reported causalities. That would be another source to check.

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona

  

David Barrett
 

A feather is a quill – a writing instrument – and may signify the status of a naval clerk

 

David Barrett

rroth@...
 

Another subject in which I am no expert, but to close off two false trails right here: the shield is clearly the US flag, so the UK does not come into it; and there is no feather, that is a leaf that the photographer might have removed but did not.

Jx. Gx.
 

TO: rroth - 

I mentioned the UK in my response because Tom Klein, who posted the inquiry, is from Toronto, Canada, and Canada is a dominion of the UK. His deceased relative may have also been from Canada.  Tom said it was a feather, not a leaf so I take him at his word.

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona

rroth@...
 

OK then I stand corrected.  I know some US citizens got into the war before the rest of the nation by going to Canada, France or Britain and serving; I gues there is no reason a Canadian might not have done the opposite.

Paul Chirlin
 

I also think that the "feather" is a leaf, an oak likely.  If you look at the original image on findagrave memorial 140651431 and view the enlarge image in color, there are many acorns and other oak leaves around the stone.  Additionally there is the cap of an acorn shown above the eagle's right wing [left side of image] and the object above the "feather" seems to be several acorn caps and twigs being clearly brown and separate not the blueish bronze color of the eagle.
 

Susan&David
 

Eagle Shield Anchor with Oak leaf and Acorns are for Navy Medical Corps. Find on google search

David Rosen
Boston MA

On 7/15/2020 9:45 AM, Paul Chirlin wrote:
I also think that the "feather" is a leaf, an oak likely.  If you look at the original image on findagrave memorial 140651431 and view the enlarge image in color, there are many acorns and other oak leaves around the stone.  Additionally there is the cap of an acorn shown above the eagle's right wing [left side of image] and the object above the "feather" seems to be several acorn caps and twigs being clearly brown and separate not the blueish bronze color of the eagle.
 

rich.meyersburg@...
 

The emblem is the one worn on Navy officers caps. Here is mine from the 1960s, a bit tarnished.  As David Rosen mentioned the other symbols indicate Medical Corps

Rich Meyersburg
Laurel, MD 20707
former LT USNR

Robert Murowchick
 

This site might be useful-- military emblems on gravestones http://gravestonesandmemorials.com/military-emblems.html
The emblem on Julius' grave (minus the acorn and leaf debris that had fallen on the gravestone in the photograph) is US Navy WWII, on Sheet 3, bottom row third from left. 
--

Robert Murowchick
Needham, MA