Topics

Origin of the name BIALYI #belarus #names


Jacques Klein
 

Does somebody knows the origin of the name BIALYI, met in Vitebsk area (Belarus)?
J.Klein
Paris, France

Envoyé de mon iPad


Alexander Sharon
 

"White" in several Slavic languages

Alexander Sharon


Kris Murawski
 

I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak” (onion-bagel”). 


Sally Bruckheimer
 

Bialy means white, like Bialyrus, now Belarus, but they were the White Russians in the Revolution. Bialys are like bagels with a dent instead of a hole in the middle, usually with onions or something in the middle, their origin, I believe, was Bailystok.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Jules Levin
 

Belarus has nothing to do with White Russians in the Revolution. The
Whites were called white to show they were not Reds.  White Russia is
was used for that area to distinguish it from Great Russia and Little
Russia, the latter being Ukaine.  It was called 'white' because it was
in the Baltic region.  The Baltic Sea means white.  Is it confusing?  No
more so than that the red states in the USA are not communists.

Jules Levin


On 7/16/2020 11:44 AM, Sally Bruckheimer via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Bialy means white, like Bialyrus, now Belarus, but they were the White
Russians in the Revolution. Bialys are like bagels with a dent instead
of a hole in the middle, usually with onions or something in the
middle, their origin, I believe, was Bailystok.
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Glenda Rubin
 

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏

Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA


On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak” (onion-bagel”). 


--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Mark Halpern
 

In the Bialystok area, there are many people with surname of Bialostocki (and similar spellings). I would assume that the surname Bialy is a shortening of the Bialostocki surname. 

As for Bialy's. They are definitely not bagels. They were a staple of my and your Bialystok ancestors lives. As Glenda says, the full name of these "rolls" was Bialystoker Kuchen. In the US these days Bialys are sold in many places, but the only ones that look and taste like the originals are at Kossar's Bialys in New York's Lower East Side and other bakeries in New York City. For more about this Bialystok delicacy, read Mimi Sheraton's book "The Bialy Eaters."

BTW, there is one restaurant in Bialystok that sells Bialy's, but they are small rolls with some poppy seeds on top -- tasty, but definitely no comparison to real Bialys. 

Mark Halpern
son of a Bialystoker mother

 

On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏
 
Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 




--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Mark Halpern
 

My mother, born in Bialystok, called them Bialys. My Galitzianer father owned a grocery/deli in NJ and had fresh bagels and bialys delivered from NY every morning. I never heard my mother refer to them as kuchen, although I now know that was the proper name for them.

Mark

 

On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏
 
Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 




--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Max Heffler
 

Mark, was their stock of Bialy’s called a Bialystok? Sorry… See you virtually next month…

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Mark Halpern via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 7:34 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

 

My mother, born in Bialystok, called them Bialys. My Galitzianer father owned a grocery/deli in NJ and had fresh bagels and bialys delivered from NY every morning. I never heard my mother refer to them as kuchen, although I now know that was the proper name for them.

Mark

 



On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏

 

Glenda [Rubin]

Richmond, CA, USA

 

 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:

I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 

 

 


--

=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


--

Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


ryabinkym@...
 

It's one more version of Belarus.  Russia, what was occupied by Mongols, called Black Russia, Belarus was not occupied, and called White Russia, or Belarus.


avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

Thanks Mark.  I was born and grew up in Queens New York.  We had an excellent bakery about three long blocks or so from our house.  Sometimes on Sunday mornings we would walk with our father to the bakery
to buy fresh Bialys for breakfast.  The onions in the center were the best part.  Delicious! 

Avivah Pinski
near Philadelphia
Researching Zuchman in Sarnaki, Karczew, and Warsaw Poland
Rubinsztejn in Sarnaki, Poland
Reznik in Drohiczyn, Siemiatische, Poland

2a.  Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus
From: Mark Halpern
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2020 20:18:08 EDT

 

In the Bialystok area, there are many people with surname of Bialostocki (and similar spellings). I would assume that the surname Bialy is a shortening of the Bialostocki surname. 

As for Bialy's. They are definitely not bagels. They were a staple of my and your Bialystok ancestors lives. As Glenda says, the full name of these "rolls" was Bialystoker Kuchen. In the US these days Bialys are sold in many places, but the only ones that look and taste like the originals are at Kossar's Bialys in New York's Lower East Side and other bakeries in New York City. For more about this Bialystok delicacy, read Mimi Sheraton's book "The Bialy Eaters."

BTW, there is one restaurant in Bialystok that sells Bialy's, but they are small rolls with some poppy seeds on top -- tasty, but definitely no comparison to real Bialys. 

Mark Halpern
son of a Bialystoker mother

 

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Myrna Waters
 

Bialys and bagels were a part of the Sunday morning ritual along with smoked white fish, carp and various salads.  This was in New Jersey and we knew
them as Bialys.  The best bialys and bagels were from NY/NJ hands down.  There was a time the delis took orders and delivered these right to your home.
That would sure be nice during our current social distancing.   

Myrna Slatnick Waters
FL.


rroth@...
 

I am a little late to this party but it seems like "Bialystocker kuchen" becoming "bialy" -- against ineffectual resistance -- would be the exact same process as what we now call a "burger" was once called a "Hamburger sandwich", probably with the capital "H", as having originated in Hamburg. You can still see it that way on menus or signs in old photos.


benagen@...
 

One didn't have to live in Bialoskok or even in Belarus to acquire the name that meant 'white' like Bialy or Bialik. The same way that Schwartz means 'black' in German but not associated to a region. The same way that Cherny / Chorny means 'black' in Russian and is also a common Jewish surname. 

Kuchen is also a German word that followed the Ashkenazim on their migration routs but was applied to different kinds of pastry at different times in different countries. 

Bena Shklyanoy, Chicago.


Jules Levin
 

Very true.  There is a surname Belastotskiy, which could have been
shortened to Belyi/Bialy, but if there is no knowledge of such
shortening there is no reason to connect to the town.

Jules Levin


On 7/19/2020 6:38 AM, benagen@... wrote:
One didn't have to live in Bialoskok or even in Belarus to acquire the
name that meant 'white' like Bialy or Bialik. The same way that
Schwartz means 'black' in German but not associated to a region. The
same way that Cherny / Chorny means 'black' in Russian and is also a
common Jewish surname.

Kuchen is also a German word that followed the Ashkenazim on their
migration routs but was applied to different kinds of pastry at
different times in different countries.

Bena Shklyanoy, Chicago.