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Austria will Allow Descendants of Holocaust Victims to Receive Citizenship Beginning September 1st #holocaust


Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

 

I previously posted about the Austrian Parliament enacting on 19 September 2019 an amendment to the Austrian Nationality Act extending citizenship to descendants of victims of the Nazis. The law becomes effective September 1, 2020.

 

An announcement is from the Austrian Embassy in Israel. Before an amendment to Austria’s citizenship law ratified last September, only survivors were entitled to receive citizenship, and then only if they left Austria due to Nazi persecution before May 1945.  The application process will be free.

 

The amendment is “in line with Austria’s ongoing endeavor for reconciliation with all those who suffered under the totalitarian Nazi-regime in Austria,” Austria’s government website states (https://www.austria.org/citizenship).

 

Eligibility is for all direct descendants of victims of Nazi-persecution in Austria who will be eligible to claim Austrian citizenship, while keeping their present nationality. Austria also widely extended the definition of victim of Nazi-persecution so that now more persons fall within the ambit of this provision. The Austrian ancestor had to be subject to persecution by associations of the NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers’ Party) or other authorities of the so-called “Third Reich” or had reason to fear such persecution.

 

A new deadline has been set as to the date of departure of the victims of Nazi-persecution from Austria: all victims will be eligible, if they left Austria before 15 May 1955. Before the date was set at 9 May 1945.

 

It is not necessary that the ancestor reclaimed and regained Austrian citizenship nor that all descendants of this person apply. Every descendant is eligible without reference to any other claimant or citizen.

 

The process can be initiated at your Austrian Embassy or Consulate General of residence abroad or directly at the competent Austrian provincial authority (“Landesregierung”).

 

Normally Austrians lose their Austrian citizenship when they apply for citizenship in another country.


to read more see: https://www.jta.org/quick-reads/austria-will-allow-descendants-of-holocaust-victims-to-receive-citizenship

 

I have no further information than what is included in this post and the links included within the posts.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Shelley Mitchell
 

This might be a silly question but I’m curious. I’ve several instances where Jews can apply for foreign citizenship while retaining US citizenship. My question is what would be the benefit of having a foreign citizenship?  Taxes?  Foreign Travel?

TIA


erikagottfried53@...
 

I would imagine that E.U. citizenship would be one advantage (at least while there's still an E.U.) -- the ability to work and go to college inside the E.U. 

One thing I wonder, since the announcement says "Eligibility is for all direct descendants [emphasis mine] of victims of Nazi-persecution in Austria," is how many generations from the victims can make that claim? Grandchildren and great-grandchildren as well as children?  And into perpetuity? (It should be, by god.)

--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Robert Fraser
 

It's not a silly question at all. I intend to apply, as I can hopefully regain the Austrian citizenship my Parents had forcibly taken from them in 1939.

Robert W Fraser, Perth, Western Australia
Researcher 6342
girof@...


veronicazundel@...
 

From a UK viewpoint, this will mean that I can retain much-valued EU citizenship when Britain leaves the EU fully at the end of the year. As we also have substantial savings and investments in Vienna (the remainder of my parents' compensatory pensions from the Austrian government) it may also remove a layer of bureacracy, or even some charges, from the bank.


Diane Jacobs
 

I know someone who got a foreign passport because she didn't want to travel with a US passport due to terrorism.

Diane Jacobs 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Shelley Mitchell <Shelley.Mitchell@...>
Date: 8/6/20 11:32 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Austria will Allow Descendants of Holocaust Victims to Receive Citizenship Beginning September 1st #austria #holocaust

This might be a silly question but I’m curious. I’ve several instances where Jews can apply for foreign citizenship while retaining US citizenship. My question is what would be the benefit of having a foreign citizenship?  Taxes?  Foreign Travel?

TIA

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


T R
 

I was told that indeed all direct descendants - including certainly grandchildren.  I didn't ask abou great grandchildren, but I don't see why they would exclude them.


Anne Buchanan
 

Like others have mentioned, the main advantage for me would be to regain the right to live and work anywhere in the EU. I have New Zealand and British citizenship but want the option to be able to join my extended family in Europe.

I've started the application process by filling out the online questionnaire and am currently pulling together all the documents I need. 

Anne Buchanan, Auckland, New Zealand
Researcher #371557
afbuchanan@...


Margo Hebald
 

Question: Although my grandfather came from Krakow (now Poland), he was always listed as "Austrian" in census, and other documents. Would I be eligible for "Austrian" citizenship?
His sister, her husband and son disappeared, from Krakow, during the Holocaust.


Margarita Lacko
 

Be advised that some countries do not accept double nationality.

Some require you to renounce your existing citizenship.

On the other hand, some countries don’t allow you to renounce your citizenship. In this last case, you are in trouble if you are applying for citizenship to a country that does not allow double nationality.

 

Margarita Lackó (#11453)

genealogy: © mishpologia@...

 


Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Margohebald asks: <<<Question: Although my grandfather came from Krakow (now Poland), he was always listed as "Austrian" in census, and other documents. Would I be eligible for "Austrian" citizenship? His sister, her husband and son disappeared, from Krakow, during the Holocaust.>>>

If your grandfather emigrated when Krakow was still part of Austria (i.e. Galicia), then he left before the First World War, before Poland regained sovereignty over that area, and long before the Nazis rose to power and invaded Poland to set off the Second World War. Despite what may have been written on a foreign census, Krakow was part of Poland for two decades before World War II. So the answer to your question would be no.

If anything, you might be eligible for Polish citizenship. But you'd need to check if you meet the criteria. In general, these laws to restore citizenship in various European countries are aimed at people (or their descendants) who lost it because of Nazi or post-war Communist persecution, not those who left before the Nazi era.

All the best,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.
Professional journalist, editor, proofreader and translator.
Certified guide at Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum and Memorial. 


feising2@...
 

feising2@...

Before applying for Dual Nationality, one should read what the US State Department position is regarding this subject. 
See: https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1d&q=US+State+Department+Services+Dual+Nationality

Frank Eisinger
Saint James, NY USA