Simonia card? #yiddish #translation


David Brostoff
 

I was very grateful to receive a translation of Yiddish handwriting on a postcard I recently posted to ViewMate, but one expression is still puzzling me: "simonia card."
<https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM83656>

Does anyone know what this could mean?

Thank you,

David Brostoff


David Brostoff
 

On Aug 18, 2020, at 7:00 PM, David Brostoff <DAVBRO@...> wrote:

I was very grateful to receive a translation of Yiddish handwriting on a postcard I recently posted to ViewMate, but one expression is still puzzling me: "simonia card."
<https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM83656>

Does anyone know what this could mean?
Someone asked me offlist what was on the other side of the postcard.

It's a portrait photo of the man who wrote the message on the card, taken probably ca. 1920.

David


Dr.Josef ASH
 

a strip of paper you you put between the pages to know tomorrow morning where had you fallen asleep...
from Hebrew "siman" - sign


Odeda Zlotnick
 

A "simmaniya" (in Hebrew) is what we used to call the dedicated cards inserted into books to mark the place you stopped reading. 
They could be quite elaborate hand made or hand decorated objects - and were of course - used again an again.

In other words: a simmanya card is a bookmark. And the "mo" would be the Ashkenazi pronunciation of the "ma" sound.

I don't what's special about the bookmark mentioned in the letter - perhaps the writer was an artist perhaps it's a sentimental issue, maybe a totally different meaning of the term with which I am not familiar, or even a code the reader would understand and the censor would not fine suspicious.

But it could be a beloved bookmark card.

Odeda Zlotnick,
Jerusalem, Israel.


Vered Dayan
 

As far as I can see the letters comprise a word that would be pronounced "simoine" [see-moy-ne]. Questions that can help: Perhaps it derives from an English word? An American name for some kind of a bank card? Wikipedia says that credit cards were "born" in the 1920s. Or perhaps there was a department store by a similar name? A calling card?
Vered Dayan
Israel


Sherri Bobish
 


I wonder if it was a card that had to be purchased by the person in The U.S. and shown by the person in Europe to get the money transfer?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIAS
"In 1923, HIAS established the HIAS Immigrant Bank at 425 Lafayette Street in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan. The bank was licensed by the State of New York.[22] Its sole purpose was to facilitate remittance or money transfers to and from immigrants’ families abroad, which was then a service not offered by most U.S. banks"

As far as I know, "credit cards" in the 1920's and later were limited to metal tags issued by specific companies, and the metal "card" could only be used at that company.  In the 1950's / 1960's my mom had an Abraham & Strauss department store "credit card."  It was a small metal tag that she kept on her key ring. It could only be used at that one store.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish





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