Multiple (male) given names and Russian patronymics #general #names


Stephen Weinstein
 

Michael

Headstones don't indicate what the person's name was.  Headstones indicate what someone who outlived the person thought that the person's name was.  If someone's children died before them and the surviving parent purchased the tombstone, then the parent's name is probably right.  If the parent died first, and the person arranging for the tombstone was the child of the deceased, and the grandchild of the father being named, who may not have even been born until after the man in question died, and certainly might not have known all the parts of his name, then the simplest explanation is that the tombstones are wrong.  And by Occam's razor, that's also the most likely explanation.

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, CA

when I found pictures of headstones of my grandmother and her sister.  According to my grandmother's headstone, he was Mordechi Avram LEVIN, and according to my great aunt's headstone, he was Yisroel Mordechi LEVIN.


N. Summers
 

I just learned that my ggf, who was known in the U.S. as Morris Alper, had the following names:
--Leib Mowshe Liss (on the passenge manifest in 1901)
--Morris Liss (on his certificate of naturalization in 1906)
--Morris L. Alper (in English on his tombstone in 1911)
--Moshe Leib, son of Yitzckok Yaakov (in Hebrew on his tombstone in 1911)

I had known that most of the Liss family changed their name to Alper when they came to the U.S., but the other names were a complete surprise to me!  I anticipate that I'll discover something similar for my ggm Chane/Sarah Ann/Annie.

PS: I had looked and looked for Morris' passenger arrival manifest on ancestry.com without success. Then I had an Ellis Island researcher look for him in their records but she didn't find him either. Finally, a few weeks ago I asked for help from this Discussion Group and one member finally found him on FamilySearch.  Two others gave me hints about how to confirm or dismiss the information using other records I had. And this weekend I received translations of his gravestone from the volunteers on ViewMate and all the pieces came together. It truly takes a village!


Nancy Summers

Maryland, USA

 

FINKELSTEIN, BOOKSTEIN, KOENIG/SUKOENIG, LUSMAN, SAGORODER/ZAGORODER (Radziwillow, Belarus/Ukraine; Ostrog, Poland/Belarus; Warsaw, Poland; Wolinsky, Russia/Ukraine)

LISS / ALPER  (Motol, Russia/Belarus)

LEAF / LIFSCHITZ ( Rechitsa, Belarus)


Shelley Mitchell
 

“Russia,” in earlier days was the broad name used to cover numerous areas which today are separate nations. I can only speak of my experiences.

When I went to bury my aunt, all the paperwork from the old country said her name was Beyla Pesia. Knowing of an earlier child name Beyla, and the tradition of hiding that name with a second name, her name should gave been Pesia Beyla It wasn’t until I translated her headstone did I find the proper order of names. A lot about names comes from who supplied the information. 

As for different surnames, there are multiple reasons. One is that when a census was taken, a person’s name was changed depending on what household they were in at the time. Based on geography, the two surnames might reflect the surnames of the two parents. 

So much depends on date and location. 

Shelly Mitchell


Michael Kaulkin
 

Dear Friends,
 
I wonder if anyone has any expertise that would shed light on what seems like a very odd situation.
 
I had never known the given name(s) of my great grandfather until a few months ago, when I found pictures of headstones of my grandmother and her sister.  According to my grandmother's headstone, he was Mordechi Avram LEVIN, and according to my great aunt's headstone, he was Yisroel Mordechi LEVIN.
 
To make things murkier, thanks to research done by a newly discovered cousin, there is strong DNA evidence that he was also the father of a man who stayed in Russia and whose Russian patronymic was "Nakhimovich"  (Aron Nakhimovich LEVIN).
 
So, my questions:
  1. Are there possible easy explanations for the discrepancies among given names?
  2. Does it seem likely that Nakhim was yet another given name of his?
  3. Are there other possible explanations for someone having a Russian patronymic that does not match is father's actual name?
I am leaving out a lot of detail in favor of succinctness, but if you think you can help and need more info, by all means, let me know!
 
Many, many thanks,
 
Michael Kaulkin (KOLKIN – Vitebsk)
Oakland, California