Jewish "juniors" in Hungary mid-1800's #hungary #slovakia


Hilary Osofsky
 

I'm wondering how to account for religiously observant Jews conferring the name of a living father upon a newborn son in Hungary in the mid-1800's.
 
In that regard, I was surprised to learn that both my Stein g-g-grandfather from Vychodna or Budapest, as well as my Reicher g-g-grandfather from Benedekfalu, had a son bearing his name c. 1846 and 1860, respectively. There is no doubt that each of them was still alive at the time.
  
I have reason to believe that both of those g-g-grandfathers were observant Jews. Of course, the Ashkenazi naming tradition is only that - a tradition, not a religious mandate.
 
Does anyone know whether there was some social or cultural trend that accounted for Jewish "juniors" during those years?

Hilary Stein Osofsky
Orinda, California
 
 


Judith Shamian
 

I discovered this week that there were Hungarian Jews that were descendants from the Spanish Inquisition I wonder if that can be a source of the practice you describe.

Judith Grunfeld Shamian


YaleZuss@...
 

Sephardim do name children after relatives who are still living, so that could provide an explanation for any father-son sharings of a given name.
 
Yale Zussman


peggyfreedman@...
 

I've found that the "rules" about naming children are really common customs that are used sometimes, but not always.  In addition to sons having the same name as a living relative, I've found that half brothers (same father, different mother) have the same names.  I haven't tracked down all the details yet, but it has happened often enough that I consider the Askenazi naming custom as just part of the evidence to be considered, not the final decision when evaluating the evidence.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, GA