US Naturalization questions (more or less general) #general #records


Rick Zeckel
 

First question: My wife's grandmother came to the US in or around 1915 when she was less than 18 years old (the story is she lied about her age to get here). Her parents did not come with her, but I don't know if any other family member did. She married my wife's grandfather in 1921. The grandfather had come to this country years earlier and had already been naturalized. Census data from later years indicate that she was a naturalized citizen. Is it logical to assume that since her parents were not there to include her in a naturalization process that she would have had to become naturalized herself (as opposed to being naturalized by inclusion with someone else's petition)? 

Second question: I am seeking the naturalization papers of a number of individuals who would have gone through the process in the 1910s and 1920s. I went to the National Archives website but they have a notice that appears to say that as a result of current Covid-19 restrictions they will not be responding to on-line requests for document copies. It is not clear to me whether or not they will respond to requests for such documents (by mail, by phone, by carrier pigeon, however). Does anyone know whether they will provide the documents at all and, if so, how to request them?

Third question: On some Naturalization papers I do have they designate the ship, port, and date of their arrival in this country. Often times I can see copies of the manifests from the various genealogy sites (Ancestry, Family Search, MyHeritage, etc.) to see what information they supplied (some of which is not available from other sources) and whether they may have traveled with other members of the family. I have also, from time to time, found the information using the Ellis Island database. I know that the information on the Naturalization papers, at least in terms of dates, is not always accurate, but typically the port of entry is. In some cases, however, I have been unable to locate such information. In one case I found a listing of Detained Aliens which were not included on the manifest itself and, probably as a result, was not listed in the database. Is that typical? If so, how can I find such listings for other ships?

Last question: Other than the genealogy sites and the Ellis Island database, are there other databases one could look at to try and obtain copies of manifests? A number of my wife's relatives entered the country through Baltimore but are not included in the genealogy site databases and, short of rummaging through the various microfilm archives (which are terribly disorganized), I don't know how to find that information.

Rick Zeckel
13919 Springmill Ponds Circle
Carmel, Indiana  46032
USA


Teewinot
 

On 8/24/2020 7:09 AM, Rick Zeckel wrote:

Second question: I am seeking the naturalization papers of a number of
individuals who would have gone through the process in the 1910s and
1920s. I went to the National Archives website but they have a notice
that appears to say that as a result of current Covid-19 restrictions
they will not be responding to on-line requests for document copies. It
is not clear to me whether or not they will respond to requests for such
documents (by mail, by phone, by carrier pigeon, however). Does anyone
know whether they will provide the documents at all and, if so, how to
request them?
I would strongly suggest you file FOIA requests to get the records. You
can thus avoid the $65.00 fee for each record, which is going up to
$255.00 on, I believe, October 2nd. Go here:

https://www.uscis.gov/records/request-records-through-the-freedom-of-information-act-or-privacy-act

Be sure to request the "A-File" for each person. It includes every
document your ancestors filled out since arrival in the USA, including
naturalization papers. The first two hours of research are free, as are
the first 100 pages. When you sign the papers you're agreeing to pay up
to $25.00 for time/pages over the above. I highly doubt that would happen.

Good Luck!
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida
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Sherri Bobish
 


Rick,

If she married in 1921, and her husband was already a citizen (by birth or by naturalization) than she automatically became a citizen.  She would not have had her own naturalization papers.

That law changed in 1922.

Interestingly, if a woman who was an American citizen married a man who was not a citizen than she lost her American citizenship.  This happened to my husband's gm in 1913, and she eventually petitioned to regain her citizenship. She was born in Manhattan.

Also, regarding manifests, see https://stevemorse.org/ for links to databases of manifests of various ports, including Baltimore.

Note that passenger's names sometimes are spelled differently in the index of different company's databases, i.e. I have seen (more than once) the name of a specific passenger spelled differently on the EIDB vs FamilySearch.  If you don't find the person when searching it pays to do a soundex search.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


viferra@outlook.com
 

Hi Rick,

I recently requested some documents from NARA via their website https://www.archives.gov/research/order and got this e-mail last week (about 2 weeks after the request):

Thank you for providing the Petition #s for your request. It makes our job so much easier.
Unfortunately, our facility is still closed due to COVID-19, so we do not have access to our records.
Your request has been placed in a queue and when we are finally able to reopen we will be in contact with you to complete your request.

So you can request documents, but your request will go into a queue with completion who knows when.

Good luck,

Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi

Belmont, CA

researching: FUERSTENBERG (Gdansk, Berlin, Shanghai) 
PROCHOWNIK (Bydgoszcz, Berlin, Shanghai)
QUIATOWSKY (Berlin, Ujest/Ujazd))
BAUM (Gdansk)
FREYSTADT (Berlin, Sweden)
HEYMANN (Israel, Geneva)
SCHULVALTER (Berlin, Brazil)
SILBERSTEIN/SILVER (Gdansk, Chicago) 

 


MARLISE GROSS
 

If you find an individual on a Detained Persons list, but not on the manifest itself, you can use the list to locate them.  The list has a column after the name that indicates where they are located on the manifest.  There is usually a page number or letter and then the line.  In the case of damaged manifests, sometimes this list is the only indication that the person was actually on that ship.

Another resource for you to look at for records is the CIty of Baltimore Archives.  They have vital records and City Directories for Baltimore.  I would suggest you contact the Archivist there to inquire about the location, if any, for Baltimore naturalization records that are not on line.  In Philadelphia, the City Archives have the Naturalization Documents from the Quarter Session court, and these are not online anywhere.

Marlise Gross
Cherry Hill, NJ


Herbert Lazerow
 

    Some women who were naturalized before 1922 by marrying husbands who were American citizens filed their own naturalization papers in th 1930s or 1940s.  It is worth checking because the naturalization petitions contain valuable genealogical information, as do the declarations of intent.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110
lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2d ed. 2020)


Stephen Weinstein
 

On Mon, Aug 24, 2020 at 06:09 AM, Rick Zeckel wrote:
Census data from later years indicate that she was a naturalized citizen. Is it logical to assume that since her parents were not there to include her in a naturalization process that she would have had to become naturalized herself (as opposed to being naturalized by inclusion with someone else's petition)? 
Rick, it is not logical to assume anything based on census records, except possibly that the person shown in the census was already born when the census was taken.  The census records just indicate what someone told the census taker.  They do not indicate whether it is true, and it often isn't.

Stephen Weinstein