Topics

US Naturalization questions (more or less general)#usa#general#records


Barbara Ellman
 

Rick posed a number of questions on Naturalizations in the US.
1. A woman marrying a naturalized citizen in 1921 would have become naturalized as a result of that marriage.  This changed shortly after this date.  There will not be any naturalization papers on this naturalization.  There is no indication of where these people lived.  If they lived in New York City, you can check the 1924 Voter Roll which is available online thru Reclaim the Records and Ancestry. Or the 1925 NY census might have a notation.
2.If you seek naturalization records from the US government, these are held by the USCIS and you will have to go through their Genealogy program to make the request.  The charges for this service are hefty and will be increasing significantly on October 2. See https://www.uscis.gov/records/genealogy  
I would suggest that before doing this you make every attempt to locate the papers using the available resources.  If you can locate the numbers and dates of the naturalization from a website such as Ancestry, you may be able to get the copy of the naturalization through a search of records on FamilySearch.  The records are only partial indexed on FamilySearch, but they have the films of many of the naturalizations and have been digitizing them.
3.  After mid-1906, the entry into the US is verified and a Certificate of Arrival was issued and is attached to the naturalization papers. Prior to this the information was not often verified.  I have one instance where my great-aunt's naturalization papers says that she arrived on a "German ship" in a year.
Ancestry has in its wisdom only indexed the Detained Aliens page for those listed on it.  However, you can use the information on the Detained Aliens page to locate the original manifest page. This page includes the Group# and line# of the passenger's location on the regular manifest.  By paging backwards through the manifest to the appropriate Group page - Group numbers will be located at the top of the manifest page.
4.  To my knowledge, Ancestry is the only genealogy site with Baltimore manifests at this time.  MyHeritage recently added Boston manifests.  Sometimes when trying to locate manifests, if you can't locate their arrival in the US, you might find the manifest for the person leaving Europe such as from England or Hamburg.  Also try searching using Steve Morse's One-Step tool at https://stevemorse.org
--
Barbara Ellman

--
Barbara Ellman
Secaucus NJ USA
HASSMAN, SONENTHAL, DAUERMAN, LUCHS - Drohobycz, Ukraine
HIRSCHHORN, GOLDSTEIN, BUCHWALD - Dolyna, Ukraine
ELLMAN, COIRA, MAIDMAN - Minkovtsy, Ukraine
KAGLE, FASS - Ulanow, Poland


isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Dear all

In his long discussion Mr. Cherson writes that Camille Pissaro was of Danish-French descent. Wrong! Jacob Abraham Camille Pissarro was born Jewish, to a father of Portuguese marrano extraction who was an active member of the little Jewish community of the island and to a local Jewish mother. He came in conflict with the Jewish community because he married the widow of his uncle which for the strict orthodox then and now is utterly forbidden. This has of course nothing to do with the judicial Cassirer issue. But to the many solutions suggested by Mr. Cherson I would add, why not donating it to the Israel's Museum in Jerusalem?

 

Prof. Isak Gath MD, DIC, DSc (Elect. Eng)

Faculty of Biomedical Engineering             Tel. Office #972-4-8294115

Technion Israel Institute of Technology             Home #972-4-9835704

32000 Haifa, Israel

 


isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Dear all

In his long discussion Mr. Cherson writes that Camille Pissaro was of Danish-French descent. Wrong! Jacob Abraham Camille Pissarro was born Jewish, to a father of Portuguese marrano extraction who was an active member of the little Jewish community of the island and to a local Jewish mother. He came in conflict with the Jewish community because he married the widow of his uncle which for the strict orthodox then and now is utterly forbidden. This has of course nothing to do with the judicial Cassirer issue. But to the many solutions suggested by Mr. Cherson I would add, why not donating the Pissaro to the Israel's Museum in Jerusalem?

 

Prof. Isak Gath MD, DIC, DSc (Elect. Eng)

Faculty of Biomedical Engineering             Tel. Office #972-4-8294115

Technion Israel Institute of Technology             Home #972-4-9835704

32000 Haifa, Israel