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Locating derivative citizenship record of minor whose parent naturalized in 1905. #records


e_zimmer@...
 

I found on Ancestry a copy of my great-grandfather's (Isaak Sand) naturalization records from the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of New York, dated December 1,1905. Attached to the court records is a slip of paper with the names of three of his 10 children who filed a derivative application for their own certificate of citizenship in 1946 and 1947. One of the applicants was my grandmother, Esther Sand Frank, who was born in Lodz, Poland and was a minor child when her father was naturalized in1905. The derivative application is dated June 24, 1946 with a file no. 0300 - 121726.

I would like to obtain my grandmother's records. I am not sure if I am applying for her C-file or if she would have one. Where I should apply? Do I need to file an genealogical index request with USCIS as the original naturalization was over 100 years ago (but it was before 1906 ) or can I file a FOIA request since my grandmother's derivative application was made in 1946?  Also I am not sure if it is pertinent, but in 1913 my great grandfather applied for and received a passport for himself and his "minor child", Esther Sand (she was 20 years old at the time). I have a record of them returning from Europe about a month after the passport was issued. Both were listed on the manifest as US citizens.  I have already checked on Ancestry, the "Subject Index to Correspondence and Case Files of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1903-1952. NARA microfilm publication T458" and found nothing. Thank you for your help.

Elaine Zimmer


Marian
 

Hi Elaine,

How fortunate you found that scrap of paper in Izaak's court naturalization records.

Assuming all three children were later issued Certificates of Derivative Citizenship, they would all have C-Files containing records not available in court records (so not available at the National Archives).

Unfortunately, the number on the paper is the application number, not the C-file number, so you would still need to file a USCIS Genealogy index search request to obtain the C-File number, then request the C-File.  The number will be preceded by a letter "A" or "AA."

Derivative C-Files are usually full of information, extra photos, and certified records submitted as evidence (birth records, parents' marriage records, etc.).  

Good luck,

Marian Smith