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Russian or Hebrew translation of birth record from Kishinev, and ? about dates #translation


Paul Chirlin
 

In researching a tree I found the JewishGen record for Sheva [Sylvia] and Srul Yisroel [Isadore] Shnayder [ Snyder] listed as twins born on 5/3/1891 or 7 Adar 2 In Kishinev.  Using a date converter, these do not match as 5 Mar 1891 is 25 Adar 1.  I am hopeful that a new translation of the Hebrew and/or Russian will be helpful. Perhaps the dates on the form are not birth dates rather registration dates? and they are not twins? They did not claim the same date as birthdates on US documents. A good copy of this document is at
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89SL-P9WC-C?i=69&cc=1943763
 

Paul Chirlin


Rodney Eisfelder
 

Paul,
Russian Empire documents generally used the Julian Calendar. In the 19th century, this differed by 12 days from the Gregorian calendar that we are accustomed to. So 5-Mar-1891 (Julian) = 17-Mar-1891 (Gregorian) = 7-Adar2 5651.
See http://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/calendar/
for a calculator that caters for Gregorian, Julian, Hebrew and other calendars.

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia


Valentin Lupu
 

Hi Paul,
Both the document and your date converter are correct! The Russian Empire used the Julian Christian calendar until 1918 when the Gregorian calendar (used in most Western countries) was adopted. The Gregorian calendar is ahead by 13 days. If you translate  7 Adar II 5651 to Gregorian, the results is March 17, 1891. It corresponds to Julian March 4, 1891. The one day difference (March 5) is due to the day change in the Hebrew calendar at evening, not at 00 am.
The most known date confusion is the Russian revolution in 1917, called "the October Revolution", October 25, 1917,  led by Lenin. Since then, it was celebrated throughout the communist countries at November 7 each year.

Valentin Lupu
ISRAEL