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Identifying where an ancestor is from #romania #ukraine #russia


mattianlevine@...
 

Hello all! I have been going over documents of an ancestor of mine and he has listed his foreign residence as many different places. They are as follows: Padol-Russia, Podol-Russia, Russia, Romania, and finally Mesbesh-Soviet Union. The best I can come up with is Medzhybizh, which was in governorate of Podolia in Russia at the time. However, reading Romania on one census confused me, unless he was confused at the time when he filled it out. Thank you all!

-Matthew Levine
 
 


Rx1500mg@...
 

Both of my grandmother's had the same residency that you mention.  They were from Russia but their next stop in traveling was Bucharest, Romania. They listed that as there last known address. Your ancestor was not confused. They  were answering literally their LAST place they had stayed, not their original residence or country of origin.

rx1500mg@...    Steven Wohlstetter


Alan Shuchat
 

It's hard to answer without knowing more details, but here is an example. My grandmother was born in Soroki when it was in the Bessarabia gubernia (governorate) of the Russian Empire. When she came to the United States she entered under the Romanian quota, because Soroki had become part of the Kingdom of Romania. Later Soroki was in the Moldavian SSR and it is now in Moldova. So she could have answered "Where were you born?" or "Where did you live?" in many ways.
--
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA


Molly Staub
 

Matthew, I believe the region you're referring to is Podolia Gubernia. My maternal grandparents cam from a town there named Krasnoye, in Podolia Gubernia. It was once Russia, but is now Ukraine. There's a genealogy story about a man who lived in three different towns, but stayed in the same house all along. The borders and governments changed, and often the names with them. Try jewishgen's Town Finder.

As another example, my paternal side came from nearby Dumbraveni, Soroki. It was Russia/Bessarabia then, became Romania in 1918, and is now Moldova.
 
Happy hunting, Molly Arost Staub
Boca Raton, FL

Searching in Podolia Gubernia:
BERENSON
GROFFMAN
and my ggm Riva's maiden name, for which I've been searching for three decades. She was a midwife in Krasnoye around the turn of the 20th century.





 


jbonline1111@...
 

Country boundaries changed quite often during the early part of the 20th century. Thus, my maternal grandfather lived in Russia when he emigrated in 1905, but listed "Poland" on his naturalization papers in the early 1930s, because that is where his town then lay.  It is now in Belarus.  
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Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


rroth@...
 

  • Alan, you mention the Romanian quota. This is a whole aspect of the geography game that I am aware of but really have paid no attention to. Probably I am not the only one. When we read today about  towns sitting in one place while the national borders shift around them it is sort of amusing, but for the immigrants it could make all the difference if one quota was open and another one was not, yes?

Robert Roth
Kingston, NY


flmillner@...
 

Wikipedia’s article on Podolia includes the following:
“The area of Podolia between the Southern Bug below Vinnytsia and the Dniester was occupied by Axis Romania as part of Transnistria.”

If the town and year fit, it could be Romanian!
Fred Millner
Flmillner@...


mvayser@...
 

On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 02:27 PM, <flmillner@...> wrote:

Wikipedia’s article on Podolia includes the following:
“The area of Podolia between the Southern Bug below Vinnytsia and the Dniester was occupied by Axis Romania as part of Transnistria.”

If the town and year fit, it could be Romanian!

Not likely, you are referring to the Romanian occupation of the area during WWII (June 1941-Aug 1944), where most of the Jewish population was murdered.
My guess is the move occurred before the fall of the Russian Empire or shortly after, as there are references to Podolia, which was the Podolia governorate. Governorates, as administrative units, ceased to exist in 1925.
But it definitely would have been helpful for the original message to include the timeframe, instead of everyone guessing when and where.  Based on the comments, it appears that there are multiple documents, including a census, so something about the timeframe of moving from Medzhibozh, Podolia should definitely be known (before WWI, interwar, after WWII, etc).

Mike Vayser