tens of thousands members "family trees" in Ancestry #general #announcements #education


kosfiszer8@...
 

Have you come across "family trees" in Ancestry with tens of thousands of members that are not a tree but what looks a collection of disjointed small family trees? They seem to be related to DNA investigations. Any idea why anybody would do this?

Angel Kosfiszer
Richardson, TX


@RichardHai
 

You wrote : They seem to be related to DNA investigations. Any idea why anybody would do this?

I have been approached by one of those sites.

There is a hope to eventually link those family trees.
Links of course can be Blood links or they can be In-law links.

Geni.com with its WORLD TREE PROJECT is useful to find both Blood links and In-law links

Kind regards
Richard Hainebach
Brussels, Belgium


Teewinot
 

Hi Angel,

Have you come across "family trees" in Ancestry with tens of thousands
of members that are not a tree but what looks a collection of disjointed
small family trees? They seem to be related to DNA investigations. Any
idea why anybody would do this?
Yes, I have. They have my close family members, but have them married
to people who are not my family. And best of all, it says we're not
even a DNA match! I have no idea what that's all about, but I find it
disturbing.

Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

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stephen@...
 

I have found a number of people on both ancestry and my heritage who have been raiding other family trees and adding them to their database. These people have been around before DNA testing and I can’t see the logic behind their collections and I think some of them are just obsessive collectors. I know a collector who has over 80,000 names and he told me he started researching his wife’s Jewish family and he enjoyed the research so much that he just kept adding names. Thanks to him I discovered a whole branch of my family, but at the same time I don’t think he was interested in correcting any mistakes in his collection.
--
Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia
stephen@...


Susan&David
 

I have found about a dozen of these for my own extended  family on Ancestry.  They are called Family Groups. 

From Google:
Definition A family group record is created to show at least the names of the husband, wife, and children of a family. Most family group records also show birth, marriage, and death information, additional spouses (if any) of the parents, and children's spouses.

The family group records I have seen usually include the source of a particular piece of information.  You can see if the source is as good as the one you have. If it is better than yours you have gained something.  My experience is that the family group record has something like an immigration date taken from a census while I have the ship's manifest itself.  Rather than being disturbed, I offer to send the person a link to the document. 

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 12/8/2020 10:44 AM, Teewinot wrote:
Hi Angel,

Have you come across "family trees" in Ancestry with tens of thousands
of members that are not a tree but what looks a collection of disjointed
small family trees? They seem to be related to DNA investigations. Any
idea why anybody would do this?
Yes, I have. They have my close family members, but have them married
to people who are not my family. And best of all, it says we're not
even a DNA match! I have no idea what that's all about, but I find it
disturbing.

Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida



Susana Rubin
 

I have found them too. They have my entire family and they mixed up photos and names. They do not reply when you send them a message. I think they are created by robots. I do not know what is the purpose, but I also find it disturbing. I asked Ancestry and they said if my tree was public they cannot do anything about. Then I made my tree private.

Susana Rubin, Ottawa, Canada


Sharona Zaret
 

Many people copy other trees that pop up as hints which is why they have so many names in their tree to begin with. In the beginning of my own research  a decade ago I was guilty but didn't take long for me to realize what I was doing wrong. Most of these are inexperienced in researching. I have experienced others copying my tree as well and mixing up parents also such as what two have said here. I keep mine private also. Unfortunately all are entitled to search however they want and no one is restricted on what is found. Ancestry does give a hint of a question mark if records and dates don't exactly match I have noticed but is ignored by quite a few. For those "more experienced" it is highly irritating. For me, though now I see immediately these people either don't realize they have these "floating names" in their tree and/or not where I am in my experience with researching. But those merely racking up the most deceased on FAG are horrible at this which is why I don't bother with that site at all. Trying to get them to change their erroneous information or even take a suggestion is just out of the question. Moderators as well don't seem to bother looking at the time passed for that one racking up names to respond to suggestions. But a lot of people do copy that information as if it is correct. I sympathize with disgruntled here but also agree that some have yielded information just unable to find otherwise such as in Stephen's case above. 

Sharona Zaret via Linda.Z, Rock Hill SC


jemanuel10@...
 

I have had some success with finding family members, but my frustration is that the view of a family group is isolated and there is
no way to connect the family laterally to other names in the tree.  I have talked to Ancestry about this and they do not have any capability
of doing this.  The owners of the tree have no idea (they never reply.)
Does anyone have a way of figuring this out?

Jane Emanuel
Lafayette, CA


jel
 

I and many others on JewishGen have ranted about this for years. There seems to be many individuals -- I call them "amassers" -- who pluck small family groups as new data appear on Ancestry and construct "trees" that are mindlessly picked up by genealogical naifs who add unrelated members of their families and construct  larger family trees. Seldom do verifying, additional sources appear that justify this mindless activity. I've contacted individuals asking about their relationship to members of my family and they either do not reply or give the lame excuse that they "forgot and have to look up" how they are related. A few have said they just saw the data on Ancestry and constructed a tree. Why? Anyone's guess. Maybe they get some sort of brownie points (in their own minds) for constructing these family group trees.
Judith Lipmanson

Smyrna, DE


andrew@...
 

I have a research tree on Ancestry that is much like you describe. 

In my case, it's not about DNA, it's about members of a landsmanschaft of which my family was a member. (Tiferes Achim Anshei Dinaburg, if it matters.)

I am using the "Friends and Neighbors" approach in the hope that as I grow this interconnected network of mini-family trees, I will find that some of them turn out to be cousins. I started by putting in everyone buried in one of the community's burial society plots, or mentioned in newspaper listings about TAAD, and so on. And I keep growing and growing those small trees and sometimes succeed in stitching them together.

I also have a tree where I'm trying to connect all known instances of the Werdesheim family name; that's now grown to 9 respectable full-sized subtrees and a few dozen scattered records that we can't yet connect, so it's the same kind of approach.

Best,
  Andrew Greene
  Newton MA


On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 1:36 PM <kosfiszer8@...> wrote:
Have you come across "family trees" in Ancestry with tens of thousands of members that are not a tree but what looks a collection of disjointed small family trees? They seem to be related to DNA investigations. Any idea why anybody would do this?

Angel Kosfiszer
Richardson, TX