Levitic Status in 19th Century Polish Vital Records #poland #records


robertjaylevy@...
 

Do people with expertise in Jewish vital records in 19th century Poland know if Levite status was typically referenced in those records?  Would the Levite status of a groom or his father typically have been noted in a marriage record in the Lomza province in the 1840s?  Would the Levite status of a father have been documented in a birth record in the Lomza province in the 1860s?

I'm tracing the Levite status of a line of my family and wondering if the absence of any mention of Levitic affiliation on records like these indicates the family were not Levites.

Thank you for any expert guidance.

Bob Levy
Los Angeles


Jill Whitehead
 

Your best bet to understand Levitic status is to take a DNA test to find out if you have the classic levite DNA markers. 

I am not aware of any Suwalki Lomza records showing this sort of information, as records were civil records and not religious records. 

The DNA of my great grandfather's line shows the classic Levite markers but his name was Abraham's/Abrams formerly Ceglarski from Suwalki. 

Not all those called Levy have the Levite markers - they may have Cohenim markers, or neither Cohenim nor Levy markers, but other ones altogether.

I have the records of one of my other great grandfathers Aaron Guttenberg from Rajgrod in Lomza Gubernia, and these are civil records which just record his birth and later marriage, and place and time of these events.

As  some of his records are recorded later in time to escape the Tsar's draft in the 1860's, I doubt he would have volunteered any other information which would have put him in danger of the draft (if he had any other information of note) . In the event, he escaped to Hull, UK in 1865 with his wife and baby daughter.

In this area of NE Poland, as it was often in the front line of conflicts (e.g. WW1 and WW2), data is less easy to find anyway.  I am not aware of anything like Ketubas/marriage contracts being found, and they are probably long lost for many places in this area. 

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK