New DNA-Based Study of Jewish Pre-History #dna #general #israel #announcements


Adam Cherson
 

Meanwhile in Megiddo: Exploring the Araxian Pedigree of Munye der Chazzan...

This illustrated paper looks closely at the ancient genetics of one small lineage within a sub-branch of a people sometimes known as Semitic, with implications for Near Eastern history. Applying a combination of tools: yDNA haplogrouping, ancientDNA, Primary Component Analysis. biblical genealogies, and archaeological finds, the result is a reconstruction of the lineage from the Epipaleolithic to the Early Iron Age. Some of the questions addressed include: 1) what is the deep genetic ancestry of the ‘antediluvian’ Near Eastern people, 2) where did the events reported in the Great Flood story occur, 3) where did Noah’s grandson Arphaxad live, 4) where did Abraham live before being instructed by G-d to migrate to Canaan, 5) what socio-political conditions surrounded Abraham’s migration, and 6) is there genetic evidence for the historicity of biblical genealogies involving Shem, Arphaxad, Abraham, Ishmael, and Aharon?


Pre-print (PDF download, free of charge): https://www.academia.edu/44710820/

Adam Cherson, MPA-JD
Khrszn haCohen Project at FTDNA
https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/cherson-family-project/about


Stephen Katz
 

Sounds fascinating and I'd love to read it, but the registration requirements of the platform academia.edu are much too intrusive. Foe example, it requires access to users' contacts. Why?

Stephen Katz


Adam Cherson
 

I have not investigated the account requirements. I signed up long ago and do not remember what was required. Perhaps there is a way to deny access to your contacts list and still download the paper?

-- Adam Cherson


Adam Cherson
 

I've looked further into the issue mentioned by Stephen Katz and have learned that in order to avoid giving over one's contacts before downloading the way to proceed is by going directly to academia.edu and opening a free account there by email (do not use google or facebook to simply download the article). Once you have your own user name and password at academia.edu you can download any article on the site.

--
Adam Cherson


mbekken@...
 

Very interesting article! Those of you less scientifically oriented might want to skip ahead after the first page or so to page 9, where the biblical parts mostly start that are in English understandable to those of us not familiar with haplotypes and the like..
 
Marijke Bekken
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beverlysteinman
 


Just wondering if this interesting research paper was peer reviewed?
And what type of organization is academia.edu?
     
            Bev Steinman


krausj2@...
 

Academia.edu is not itself an "organization." It's a forum in which academics can share publications that have been, usually, peer-reviewed elsewhere. 

It's a good question about whether and how this paper was peer-reviewed.
--
Joe Kraus
krausj2@...


rroth@...
 

My guess is that it's a way to AVOID peer review. 

Their first screen says "Academia is the easiest way to share papers with millions of people across the world for free. A study published in PLOS ONE found that papers uploaded to Academia receive a 69% boost in citations over 5 years."

So kind of the academic equivalent of self-publishing?

Robert Roth


Adam Cherson
 

Thanks for the peer-review discussion.

 

The article is a pre-print, which usually means not yet submitted to the peer-reviewing process, and made available for various purposes (see below). By presenting the entire project, from raw data to conclusion, I wish to allow any other researcher to examine, judge, replicate, and otherwise interpret the data, whether their findings and conclusions support or negate my own.

 

I have included with this paper: 63 pages of Extended and Supplemental Data, an Interactive Project Map, the Project Haplotree, 23 spreadsheets containing Primary Component Analysis statistics, and footnoted citations to prior literature of recent vintage, some of which is not peer-reviewed. As with any scientific work, this paper also relies on certain presumptions which are described in Footnote 14.

 

The purposes of publishing this pre-print are: 1) to share immediately and fully some novel findings with interested researchers, and 2) to invite substantive commentaries and criticisms from researchers in all associated fields on any aspect of the paper. This continuous process will help to improve reasoning and presentation, and perhaps one day lead to a more formal peer-review submission -- if there is a journal interested in a paper reporting results from an FTDNA genetic genealogy project being used as a basis for biblical historicization. If there do happen to be any journal editors reading this discussion who would like to publish such a paper, please contact me privately.


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Adam Cherson