Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada


Teewinot
 

Happy New Year Cousins!

I'm trying to figure out a possible puzzle. I say possible, because I'm
not even sure I have the right people (same common name).

According to one index I found, it has my cousin (definitely him) taking
the Oath of Allegiance in Montreal in June 1923.

I found a person of the same name in the 1921 Canada census for
Montreal. Some of the information fits and makes sense (occupation and
marital status), some of it doesn't. It says this person's nationality
was "United States" and that he arrived in Canada in 1920. It was my
understanding that my cousin went right from Grodno Gubernia to Montreal
(date unknown), but I suppose that could be wrong.

How long did a person have to live in Canada before they could apply for
and obtain citizenship? I thought it was five years. This seems like
too short a time if these two people are one and the same.

Thank you,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

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Janette Silverman
 

Hi Jeri:
The other information that doesn't fit your narrative is that person's nationality as U.S. when applying for Canadian citizenship. That person would have had to been in the U.S. for 5 years to gain U.S. citizenship. That means, if he arrived in Canada in 1920, and say he left Canada immediately upon receiving U.S. citizenship, he would have been in the U.S. from at least 1915.
Janette Silverman
Phoenx, AZ and Salt Lake City, UT


Teewinot
 

Hi Janette,

The other information that doesn't fit your narrative is that person's
nationality as U.S. when applying for Canadian citizenship. That person
would have had to been in the U.S. for 5 years to gain U.S. citizenship.
That means, if he arrived in Canada in 1920, and say he left Canada
immediately upon receiving U.S. citizenship, he would have been in the
U.S. from at least 1915.
Yes, I'm aware of the rules for citizenship in the U.S. I know he (Sam)
probably came early, because his uncle arrived in Montreal in 1899
(according to his U.S. naturalization papers) and then boarded a train
to NYC and settled there, although, so far, I haven't found the uncle on
a manifest (ship did not arrive on the date and year listed on the
papers). I suspect the brothers traveled together with Sam, but I have
yet to prove that. So, the U.S. citizenship doesn't concern me, since
it would fit. What I don't get is how Sam could have gained Canadian
citizenship so fast - immigrating to Montreal in 1920 and taking the
Oath of Allegiance in 1923. How was he able to cut out two years of the
process? That's what puzzles me. This side of the family has always
been a huge mystery, and this is just one small part of that!

On a side note, by any chance would you happen to be related to an
Abraham Silverman of NYC, who died in 1970? He was the owner of Lenox
Wallpaper. The original family name was Krasnopolsky.

Thanks!
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

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Avrum Lapin
 

My grandfather became a Canadian citizen in Nov 1906 after residing 3 1/2 years in Canada (per his naturalization Certificate)

At some time in 1905 (per the St Albans list) he travelled by train to New York where he was introduced to my Grandmother. He returned to Montreal and after an approximately one year correspond returned to Brooklyn, married my Grandmother. and then they both took up residence in Canada.

My grandmother did not become a Canadian citizen until 1941. (possibly a wartime need for a passport to visit cousins in New York

The Canadian Naturalization Act that was inforce in 1906 governed the length of residence needed for citizen ship


Avrum Lapin
avrum223@...
Searching LUBELSKI of Bialystok and LAPUNSKI of Grodno


temafrank1@...
 

They could be "naturalized" as Canadians after 3 years.
--
Tema Frank
Edmonton, Canada
Project: https://temafrank.com/tema-frank-history-detective/


Teewinot
 

Hi Avrum,

My grandfather became a Canadian citizen in Nov 1906 after residing 3
1/2 years in Canada (per his naturalization Certificate)

At some time in 1905 (per the St Albans list) he travelled by train to
New York where he was introduced to my Grandmother. He returned to
Montreal and after an approximately one year correspond returned to
Brooklyn, married my Grandmother. and then they both took up residence
in Canada.

My grandmother did not become a Canadian citizen until 1941. (possibly a
wartime need for a passport to visit cousins in New York

The Canadian Naturalization Act that was inforce in 1906 governed the
length of residence needed for citizen ship
Interesting. I had no idea that my cousin had come to live in the USA
first and naturalized there. I was under the impression he went right
to Montreal. It all fits now. Maybe I'll be able to find him at Ellis
Island, unless he did arrive in Montreal first like his uncle. I have
no idea.

Thanks for this information.

Take care,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

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Sharon E Siegel
 

We have relatives named Friedman, who derived from Rzezak. They came from Poland hometown via Feldafing,Germany, I believe.  What that be your family?
--
Sharon E. Siegel 
Port Jervis, NY USA


Teewinot
 

Hi Tema,

They could be "naturalized" as Canadians after 3 years.
Thank you! I thought it was five years. Three years fits perfectly
(along with the other info), so this must be the correct person.

BTW, my great great grandmother's name was Tema.

Stay safe,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

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Alan Greenberg
 

You are sort of correct, but not quite.

First, there was no concept of Citizenship in Canada. If you naturalized, you because a British Subject (citizenship in Canada did not come about until 1947). But that does not alter your basic question. The Naturalization Act of 1914 required an applicant to have been resident in Canada for at least 1 year, and resident in some British territory for at least 5 years. So residence in England for 4 years followed by just 1 year in Canada would suffice.

That probably does not address your case. Census data is notoriously unreliable. The naturalization file would likely give the data of arrival as well as the ship.

Sadly with the pandemic, as Jeri knows, it is taking many months to get naturalization records.

Alan Greenberg
JGS-Montreal





At 2021-01-03 03:47 PM, Teewinot via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Happy New Year Cousins!

I'm trying to figure out a possible puzzle. I say possible, because I'm
not even sure I have the right people (same common name).

According to one index I found, it has my cousin (definitely him) taking
the Oath of Allegiance in Montreal in June 1923.

I found a person of the same name in the 1921 Canada census for
Montreal. Some of the information fits and makes sense (occupation and
marital status), some of it doesn't. It says this person's nationality
was "United States" and that he arrived in Canada in 1920. It was my
understanding that my cousin went right from Grodno Gubernia to Montreal
(date unknown), but I suppose that could be wrong.

How long did a person have to live in Canada before they could apply for
and obtain citizenship? I thought it was five years. This seems like
too short a time if these two people are one and the same.

Thank you,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

--
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Molly Staub
 

Feldafing was a Displaced Person’s’ Camp after World War II liberation. My adopted sister, a Holocaust survivor, was there after Dachau and before coming to the U.S.

Molly Arost Staub
📱


Paul Silverstone
 

Some of my relatives obtained their Canadian citizenship years after
arriving. Many of their records were destroyed, especially those that
became citizens before 1900.
On the reverse side, a Canadian woman marrying a citizen of another
country lost her Canadian citizenship. My mother married in 1930 to a
US citizen for instance. Since they were not living in the US, but in
Britain, she eventually received a British passport (Canada being
British), until she was naturalized in the US in 1942, three years after
arriving in NY. When they wanted to travel together in 1930 she
received a paper from the US consulate in London identifying her as
married to an American citizen.
--
Paul Silverstone
West Vancouver, BC

see: www.paulsilverstone.com