Tombstone translation #translation


pathetiq1@...
 

This is a very old tombstone which unfortunately is barely readable. Still, i was wondering if  anyone could tell me whether  any names (father's or the deceased's) are mentioned. Thanks in advance. 
--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


Dubin, David M. MD
 

Here lies (abbreviation)
our modest mother, Ms Liba
daughter of Mr Elija (?) from Vilna (?) wife of 
Mr Josef Zeleznik, died
on Monday 24 days in the month of 

Kislev in year 654 by the short count (ie 5654)
May her soul be bound in the bonds of everlasting life (abbreviation)
Looking at the secular date of December 3 I am not clear on the Hebrew year. Please let me know date of death and I’ll update my translation of the Hebrew date. Thanks
David Dubin


fredelfruhman
 

As you say, this is difficult to read, but here is what I could make out.

Her Hebrew name was Leeba.

Her father's name began with ELI, possibly Elimelech.

Her husband's name was Yosef Geliznik.

The Hebrew date of death looks like the 24th day of the month of Kislev of the year 5655.

This is off by a few weeks from the secular date on the stone, December 3, 1894, which corresponds to the 5th or the 6th of Kislev, 5655.
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


pathetiq1@...
 

Thank you for your replies. According to her death certificate she died on Dec 3, 1893. I believe that the year (1891) written on the stone was a mistake. 
--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


fredelfruhman
 

Thank you for the corrected secular date.

The Hebrew letters that represent the numbers 4 and 5 are very similar (5 has a small extra piece, which is often difficult to see or is eroded). 

Looking again at the stone, I am changing my original reading of the year:  5654, rather than 5655. 

The date of December 3, 1893, corresponds to the 24th or 25th day of Kislev (the 24th, if she died before sunset, the 25th, if she died after sunset).  Again, it is not absolutely clear if the last digit is a 4 or a 5.  

December 3, 1893,
was a Sunday.  If she died after sunset, this would be considered Monday in the Jewish calendar. 
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA