Towns in the region of Giessen, Germany #germany


ylaltein@...
 

I'm trying to decipher place names written in Hebrew by a mohel recording the names and places of boys he circumcised. All these locations are in the region of Giessen, in Hesse, Germany. 

I'm having difficulty deciphering the following towns: 

היער
לאשדערן

Any assistance with this would be greatly appreciated!

Yehuda Altein


Ralph Baer
 

Could היער be the word Hier indicating that the circumcision took place in the Mohel’s hometown?

--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Rodney Eisfelder
 

Yehuda,
Without much confidence, for לאשדערן I suggest Lausdorn, which is a tiny place in northern Luxembourg, about 220km west of Giessen. The country of Luxembourg has never had a large Jewish community, but if this village ever had a Jewish family that needed a mohel, you would think they could find one closer then Giessen - Bonn, Brussels and Metz are all closer than Giessen, and Trier is closer still. How confident are you in the reading of the individual letters? Perhaps a posting on viewmate would help?

For
היער, my first thought, like Ralph Baer, was that the circumcision took place "here".

I hope this helps,
Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia


ylaltein@...
 

In other places, when referencing circumcisions in his hometown, the mohel writes מכאן. Also, isn't "here" English, not German?

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY


ylaltein@...
 

Thank you! The problem is that almost all the other towns he references are within a 10-mile radius of Giessen (e.g., Lollar, Alten-Buseck, Daubringen). 

I'm pretty sure those letters are accurate - he references these towns a number of times, and each time it's quite clear this is what it says.

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY


ylaltein@...
 

I'm sorry; I now see that "hier" does mean "here" in German. This might be what he means. Thank you!

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY


Ralph Baer
 

The German word Hier and the English word Here have the same meaning and are pronounced the same except for the R.
--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Eva Lawrence
 

Hello Yehuda
I looked in the index of a very detailed Meyers German atlas, and the only  interpretations possible were if you guessed that the dalet was in fact a resh. They can look similar. In that case there  were places called Lescherhof and Laserg on the same page as Giessen which might have had suitable variations of their name at the time the Mohel list was made.  It's an approach I've used for areas, but I'm not familiar with Giessen. Of course, changing one of the other consonants instead might also help.
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Reuven Mohr
 

there is a place spelled Leihgestern South of Giessen, today part Linden. Considering local pronunciation, I would expect a spelling like לאגשדרן . Maybe the gimel was lost by mistake.
It definitely had a community.

Reuven Mohr
Israel


Andreas Schwab
 

Leihgestern had 46 Jews in 1830: https://www.lagis-hessen.de/de/subjects/idrec/sn/ol/id/10372
Note also the transitin [ei] > [a:] in Central Hessian dialect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessian_dialects

--
Andreas Schwab, Montreal, Canada


ylaltein@...
 

Thank you everyone for all your help! It seems to me that the most reasonable translation is "here" for היער and Leihgestern for לאשדערן.

Here are samples of the place names:



"In 1836 I circumcised his son Yonah, from here."



"I circumcised the boy Kaufman son of Chaim from Leihgestern on Thursday, 13 Shevat, 5611."

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY


ylaltein@...
 

Interestingly, he also writes Leihgestern clearly:



"I circumcised the boy Moshe son of Chaim from Leihgestern on Thursday, 15 Shevat, 5612."

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY


ylaltein@...
 

Maybe it's the same Chaim...? (Another boy exactly a year later!)

Yehuda Altein
Brooklyn, NY