searching for family #dna


dcole1947@...
 


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Hi to all,
I just joined this site after finding through dna that I am 49.9% Ashkenski jewish! I am so happy to find this information. I was given away at birth and know nothing of my genetics. I am desperate to find any information. I was born July 19,1947 in Bakersfield , California in Kern County. Listed on my birth certificate is George White and Irene Arrow from San Fransico, California. I am not sure if this is correct information. I was given to Floyd and Estelle Le May and never formally adopted. If anyone has any information, I would be enterally grateful!
Deanna LeMay Cole
dcole1947@...
Deanna Cole


Sarah L Meyer
 

Deanna, you need to do some genealogy on the names on your birth certificate.  Also if you are on Facebook, there are a number of excellent Jewish and general genealogy groups that you can ask to join, including DNA detectives, Tracing the Tribe, DNA your Jewish journey, Genealogy with Jan and Nora, etc.  It does sound like one of your two parents is genetically Jewish and probably either did not know it or chose to ignore it.   Then you can work with your match list to see if you see matches that fit with George White or Irene Arrow.   Right now you are concerned with your birth parents.
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Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Alicia Weiss
 

DNA Detectives. 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/DNADetectives/

 There are also adoption "search angels" who will assist with searches for bio-parents, for example: https://www.searchangels.org/
The good news is that because only one of your biological parents was Ashkenazi Jewish, your DNA analysis will be less plagued by the effects of endogamy and  shared matches with your maternal and paternal lines should be easy to distinguish.  And as Sarah says, do some  the traditional/documentary  research on the names on your birth certificate, but remain flexible in your thinking if the DNA does not support those being the correct names.   Ideally, you want to find the most recent common ancestor among your matches on each side, then work forward to more recent generations to identify individuals who were in the right place at the right time to be your biological parent. The best of luck to you.

Alicia Weiss
Researching: WEISS/WEISZ Szecseny, Hungary; KUNDLER, Kaposmero/Kisvarda/Gyongyos/Budapest, Hungary; POLLAK, Kaposmero/Csurgo, Hungary;PRESSMAN/PRESEISEN, Kiev, Ukraine; GOLDFELD, Russia; Dufine/Dufan/Dufayn, Orgeev Moldova/ Tuchin Ukraine; MAUTHNER/MAUTNER, Szecseny, Hungary, HEMPEL/HAMPEL, Poland.