Who was Cousin Jossel A in Philadelphia? #usa


Lin Mor
 

My maternal grandmother arrived at Ellis Island on December 6, 1907 on the ship Graf Waldersee. The manifest states that she was going to a cousin in Philadelphia, Jossel A? I have researched Arg...wsky in various combinations of the unknown and questionable written letters with no success. Attached is a copy of the original manifest page (see line 29), and the best attempt to make the name larger.  I have been unable to discover any possible similar names in my family tree documentation in all of my 40+ years of research. I am hoping that there are members of this discussion group who would have suggestions on how to proceed. Thank you! 

Linda Cohen Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

 

Researching:

 

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelets and Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany and France

KOSOFSKY in Shchuchyn, near Lida, Belarus

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Susan&David
 

It is Aronowsky / Aronovsky
The "h" in the line below extends high enough to make the  first "o" in the name above appear to have a  descender, making it look like a "g".  

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 3/6/2021 4:45 PM, Lin Mor wrote:
My maternal grandmother arrived at Ellis Island on December 6, 1907 on the ship Graf Waldersee. The manifest states that she was going to a cousin in Philadelphia, Jossel A? I have researched Arg...wsky in various combinations of the unknown and questionable written letters with no success. Attached is a copy of the original manifest page (see line 29), and the best attempt to make the name larger.  I have been unable to discover any possible similar names in my family tree documentation in all of my 40+ years of research. I am hoping that there are members of this discussion group who would have suggestions on how to proceed. Thank you! 

Linda Cohen Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

 

Researching:

 

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelets and Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany and France

KOSOFSKY in Shchuchyn, near Lida, Belarus

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus

Attachments:



Ralph Baer
 

Perhaps it reads Aronowsky.
--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Risa Heywood
 

Maybe Aronowsky? Here are some ideas to break through this type of brick wall:

  • Was your grandmother detained or held for Special Inquiry? There would probably be an SI or an 'x' next to her name. Make sure to find the detention and special inquiry pages. They are usually at the end of the passenger list pages for her ship. Sometimes they would write the name and/or relationship of the person she was going to. Different clerk so maybe the handwriting is easier to read.
  • Use wildcards to search on Ancestry for that surname, such as 'a*owsky' in Philadelphia. The asterisk substitutes for the unknown missing letters.
  • Especially for immigrants going to Philadelphia, try the Philadelphia immigrant bank records. Maybe Jossel bought her ticket. Search on JewishGen or Ancestry for the index records. The actual steamship ticket purchase ledgers are on the Temple University library website: https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p16002coll16.
  • Check the address on the passenger list in the census records. For 1907, I would try the 1910 U.S. census. Use Steve Morse's Unified Census ED Finder tool: https://stevemorse.org/census/unified.html.
  • Jossel could have been Americanized to any name but Joseph would be a likely change.
--
Risa Daitzman Heywood
Arizona


Barbara Zimmer
 

What was your grandmother's name?  I'd like to look at the original manifest.  

Have you tried to figure out the address in Philadelphia?  207 ?? Street. 

Barbara Zimmer

Norfolk VA 


marlene finkelstein
 

Try looking at the 1910 census for the people living at the address in Philadelphia that is given for Jossel. I can't make out anything but 207 C ??? but hopefully someone more familiar with the streets of Philadelphia can help you. The address that is, not the Bruce Springsteen song!

Marlene Finkelstein


Molly Staub
 

Try Chestnut Street. Thant was the area near the docks where many Jewish immigrants settled.

Molly Arost Staub
Boca Raton, FL

Searching 
Bessarabia: AROST/KHAROST, SHTOFMAN
Ukraine: BERENSON, GRAFFMAN


Michele Lock
 

The street name looks like it begins with Col or Cal, but other than that I can't make it out.

# 207 means it would be between 2nd and 3rd streets, which run North/South in the city.

At the time a lot of Jews settled in South Philadelphia, in the area of 4th street and South St., so maybe one of the streets around there might be it. Possibly areas around Reed St. as well.

Another option - I also had a mystery uncle on a ship manifest that my paternal grandmother was going to in New York City, when she arrived in 1913. Except his name and address were unreadable, and I didn't think we had any relatives in NYC.
It was AncestryDNA that solved the mystery. I matched as a 3rd/4th cousin with 4 different persons in one family, whose DNA accounts were managed by a man in Scarsdale NY. He told me that I was matching people on the Schiffman branch of his family. Fortunately, he had a decent family tree, and a Morris Schiffman was there who had a first wife with the same maiden name as my grandmother. The first wife turned out to be an unknown sister to a paternal great grandfather. And when I looked back at the ship manifest, it does look like M. S.....man. 
--
Michele Lock

Lock/Lak/Lok and Kalon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lewin/Levin in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


jswack@...
 

Have you looked at the Philadelphia boat ticket savings banks?  These have been a goldmine for my own family’s immigration to Philadelphia. 
They are indexed on Jewishgen. The actual ticket books are online at the Temple U. site.  All of my mom’s mother’s extended family’s ticket orders are on it except for the first ticket. 


jswack@...
 

i second the suggestion about the boat records. For me they are a total goldmine of information and helped link my mother’s maternal family together.  You can see who the money was sent to, how much it cost, what boat they came on, the address of the person sending the money (often more than one relative as they banded together), and the names of all the passengers. I’ve been saving screenshots of all of the many ticket records for my family in this collection.