WWI Draft Registrations & proof of naturalization status #records


Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Margie,

This site has helpful info on WW1 and naturalization rules, and tips on where to research those who naturalized while serving in the U.S. military:

United States World War I Naturalization and Citizenship
https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/United_States_World_War_I_Naturalization_and_Citizenship

Also, men who signed up for the military in WW1 prior to the draft cards, would not have filled out a draft card.  Unlike WW11, not all men were drafted.  So, if you see a WW1 draft card for someone, that does not mean that they ever served.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Marjorie Geiser
 

Laurie,

It will be interesting to hear what others have found, in terms of papers, but it's' my understanding that immigrants who signed up to fight in WWI were given citizenship as a result. I found the same thing with one ancestor, but I've yet to find actual papers.

Margie Geiser
Arizona, USA

LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/ZYLBERNAGEL/SILVER, EPSTEJN/EPSTEIN, MOCZYDLOWER/MOCHEDLOVER, ERLICH, GRUNPELTZ, JOSKOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN, SZTABINSKA, WILK


Laurie Sosna
 

Looking at my ancestor's WWI Draft registrations, I noticed that Joseph Friedson said he was naturalized and the registration clerk made a note: "Did not see his papers" in section 30 of the form.

This got me wondering: Were registrants required to show their Declaration of Intention as proof of "Declarant" or "First Papers" status when registering for the draft in WWI? Web searches are not giving me much help.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA