Moving Frequently Among Ukraine Towns #ukraine


Sally Bruckheimer
 

This was not only in Ukraine. My Ruslander family, which arrived about 1835 from farther East and took that surname, by 1870 lived in Augustow, Raczki, Sztabiin, Rajgrod, Marjampol, Alinka, Nur, and more towns as well as France. One cousin, who came to the US from Augustow, said on his naturalization papers that he was born in Marseilles (during the 1860s rebellion, cholera, and famine).

Since I can connect all the people in my tree, and I have a letter backing up the relationships, I wouldn't consider any family in any location as constantly living in one location. I have other parts of my family in other locations who also moved around.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Stefani Elkort Twyford
 

Herbert, 
This post was very interesting to me. It was told that my great-grandfather "had a tavern and made vishnick." When he came to NYC in 1906, according to his shipping record, he had $600 on him. That was an amazing amount of money at that time. Could these shenkers have made that kind of money doing what they did?
--
Stefani Elkort Twyford
Researching: Siegal/Segal, Spiel, Tarle, Ilkovics, Feiermann, Kronenberg, Szerman, Kletzel, Ricker/Ricken


Herbert Lazerow
 

   Some Jews in that part of Galicia were shenkers.  They ran inns or taverns and, under lease from the local noble, had a monopoly of the making and selling of alcoholic beverages. It was common for these leases to be for the calendar year. The shenker might choose to move to another town because he received better lease terms there, or because the noble refused to renew the lease. Given what the weather was like at that time of year, there was a strong disincentive to move in the 19th century, that was often overcome by either opportunity or necessity.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110 U.S.A.
(619)260-4597 office, (858)453-2388 cell, lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (2d ed. Carolina Academic Press 2020)

--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110
lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2d ed. 2020)


kdomeshek@...
 

The Wandering Jew is more than an attractive plant and the practice of "wandering" was not unique to Ukraine.  It happened throughout the old country.  Contributing factors could include:

1.  traditionally large families...a numbers game, as a descendant was bound to leave the original parental shtetl eventually.
2.  economic necessity...many of our ancestors were poor/impoverished and they pursued a better living standard.
3.  marital considerations...this often resulted in clusters of the extended family appearing in surrounding shtetls, with movement back and forth over generations.  The larger the family relative to the size of the homestead shtetl, the more likely this was to happen.
4.  anti-Semitism...was there a safer place to live?
5.  education and training...if it was not sufficiently available in the homestead shtetl.  Skilled trade apprentice or rabbinical training are examples.
6.  wars...parts of the old country had frequent conflicts, which prompted civilian movement.
7.  death of the patriarch...a subset of economic necessity, where the widow and children might move.
8.  Russian May Laws...its hard to conscript a Jewish male for two decades of cannon fodder, if you cannot find him.  (This sometimes accompanied a surname change.)

Ken Domeshek.  Houston, TX.


Steven M. Greenberg
 

My experience is that micro-movements of elements of a family between nearby villages and cities was typical and had not really anything to do with the Ukraine, which did not come into lasting recognized existence until 1991. 

Rather, it had everything to do with coordinating marriages of the children of different, nearby families, requiring a member of one family to relocate to  the family of a spouse in an adjacent or nearby village (walking distance, really), the availability of work in a butcher shop, for example, and in the case of cities during the early 20th century, the location of economic opportunity and also the presence of the university.  Longer range movements often can be attributed to town scale or region scale disaster such as fire, pogrom or disease.  Indeed some waves of the late 19th and early 20th century migration can be linked to loss of economic opportunity in one's ancestral home resulting from an economic depression, disease or fire. 

It helps me to visualize a time when lifting up roots and relocating was not so difficult compared to modern times.  Today, to move to a town next door requires the listing and sale of an expensive asset (house) and the purchase of a new expensive asset (new house).  Or at least the expiration of one lease and the establishment of a new lease.  But a century ago, one could simply pack a bag and go live with the family of a new spouse.

--
Steven M. Greenberg

GRÜNBERG/ROZENWASSER/BERGMANN/KONIG (Gwozdziec / Obertyn/ Zablatov / Kolomyja, Ukraine)
KAHAN / KAHN / KAGAN / KRETZMAN (Kraslava, Latvia and Kowno / Kaunas, Lithuania)
URESTKII / URASKY / URETSKY (Mayzr / Kopkavichi / Klinkavichi, Belarus)
REINFELD/HOLTZ/ZIMMERMAN/ROTTLER (Lubaczow, Poland and Wielke Oczy, Poland and L'viv, Ukraine)
ERTAG/KALT (Gorodok, Ukraine and Przmysl, Poland and Dynow, Poland)
KUSHNIROV/PORTNOI (Zlatopil / Mikhailovka / Oleksandrivka / Smiela, Ukraine)


Max Heffler
 

Felissa,

My grandfather’s parents also moved around and had children in or registered in these Western Ukraine towns:

 

Zwiniacz/Mielnica and Ozeryany in the Borschiv area of greater Ternopil. My great-grandmother was from Korolowka and her father from Skala. Seems like there was a lot of movement between these towns. Seems all of the Jewish Hefflers that immigrated via Ellis Island came from this 50-mile radius region of what is now Western Ukraine.

 

Max Heffler

Houston, TX

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Felissa Lashley via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Saturday, April 3, 2021 4:55 PM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Moving Frequently Among Ukraine Towns #ukraine

 

As I am putting together my family stories, I have noted that there
seems to be a lot of moving/relocating among towns and villages. In my
family this seems to be mostly among Moshny, Gorodische, Valyava,
Korsun, Smela, Cherkassy and also Kanev all in the Ukraine.

Does anyone know if this was relatively common or what some of the
reasons might have been?

Thank you.

Felissa Lashley
frlashley@...
Austin, Texas

Researching: DROBITSKY; MAZUR/MOZER/MAZURENKO; ZATULOVSKY/SATLOFF;
LISHINSKY/LESCHINSKY; FILTSKI


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


Felissa Lashley
 

As I am putting together my family stories, I have noted that there
seems to be a lot of moving/relocating among towns and villages. In my
family this seems to be mostly among Moshny, Gorodische, Valyava,
Korsun, Smela, Cherkassy and also Kanev all in the Ukraine.

Does anyone know if this was relatively common or what some of the
reasons might have been?

Thank you.

Felissa Lashley
frlashley@...
Austin, Texas

Researching: DROBITSKY; MAZUR/MOZER/MAZURENKO; ZATULOVSKY/SATLOFF;
LISHINSKY/LESCHINSKY; FILTSKI