Why Did Jews Marry Christians? #general


Alan Cohen
 

A niece of my wife's great-grandfather was baptized into the Catholic faith in order to marry the love of her life on the same day in February 1876 in Plock. They had nine children, the descendants of one of whom I am in contact with still living in Poland. At least one of the family, although a Catholic was nominated by Yad Vashem as one of the Righteous among Nations for his help during the Shoah.
Alan Cohen


Larry Gaum
 

Many they just fell in love. Simple as that.
Larry Gaum
Toronto, ON.


Lin Mor
 

Yes! In the case of my grandfather's brother, he did not actually embrace another religion. I do not know any of the specifics, but his granddaughter stated that he did the formal conversion for, as she said, business reasons. You are making a good point that it could be a tax reason. Or a political reason. Or a social reason to expand his business, whatever it was. He was married to a Jewish woman and has Jewish descendants. Do not know if his wife converted. No one is around with first-hand knowledge but particular actions can be researched by someone in Russia. I suspect that Jews were taxed at a higher rate or more frequently, paid more to get licenses, etc. I do know the family had several businessmen.

Here is a Rostov-on-Don entry for a business that I believe was of his son: (This may be the son Moshe/Michael who immigrated to Palestine in the 1920's)

Business directory 1910

 

AMCHISLAVSKY M. I.  bed manufacturing, Bolshaya Sadovaya ulitsa 115

From Linda Cohen Morzillo, Saratoga Springs, NY


Jules Levin
 

Regarding the Conversos, according to Professor Netanyahu, a historian
of the Inquisition, approximately half the Conversos were sincere
converts to Christianity.  By the way, as I recall, Lenin's grandfather,
surname Blank, was considered a Jew, altho of course a convert.  He was
an estate owner--a member of the gentry class.

Jules Levin

Los Angeles


On 4/8/2021 6:59 AM, Lin Mor wrote:
Even though my maternal grandfather's brother converted to Russian
Orthodox for "business reasons" in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, his
descendants identify as Jewish. Consider the possibility that the
conversion served as the "public religion." Think about the Conversos
of Spain and Portugal, I think perhaps there are some similarities
here, but with nowhere as dire consequences.

Linda Cohen Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

Researching:

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelets
and Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany and France

KOSOFSKY in Shchuchyn, near Lida, Belarus

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Francis AMAR
 

Could you envisage as an "extreme way" that jews married christians because they were in love ? :-)))
Kind regards,
Francis Amar


Eva Lawrence
 

Two  Jewish men from my German family married Christian women in England i the second half of the 1800s.  My grandmother's uncle Julius had  travelled to America and back while still a teen-ager, and did not wish to return to his family home in Bonn where he was liable for military service.  He would no longer have been steeped in Jewish culture, London was an exciting, welcoming place and he married his wife in church, because it was the respectable thing to do.  He signed the marriage record with his full name , including that of his rabbinical grandfather, Bonim, and   never fathered any children. So perhaps he retained some feeling of guilt.
Juius's nephew,   Ernst, too, came to London, thirty years later, a slightly feckless and immature 19-year-old. He had lost both his parents and his older brother was already living near Julius in England as a trainee clerk .  It seems Ernst turned to a servant-girl for comfort.  She had a child nine months later, and he then married her in a register office,  although it looks as if both his brother, his uncle Julius and the young woman's family disapproved. 
This practical young woman more or less supported my great-uncle while bearing him four more  children, working as a cook when he was unable to hold down a job.  His German nationality at the start of the Great War broke up the marriage and he was sent back to Germany, where he went back to his Jewish identity to rejoin his relatives there.
It's not an uplifting story, but it is a human one, and each mixed marriage will a reason of its own. 
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


spolon@...
 

Oscar de Lubicz-Milosz's mother was Rosa or Rozalia Rosenthal, a student at Warsaw University. Her father was a teacher in Warsaw. Oscar was born in 1877, but baptized only in 1886 in the church Saint-Alexander in Warsaw. Even if it is not as romantic as Jules tells, I agree with him we cannot underestimate the role of Cupid! 

Max Polonovski
Paris


Odeda Zlotnick
 

I would rephrase the question:
Could a Jewish woman in Lvov preserve wealthy family assets by marrying a Russian Orthodox man?
And I would research the subject by trying to learn about the relationship between females and their family assets in Galicia, and then to try focus on what this means for a Jewish female.

--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


Jules Levin
 

Eros


On 4/8/2021 12:41 PM, Sarah L Meyer wrote:
In the 19th century Jews married Christians either for marriage or to
protect their family from antisemitism or for economic reasons - to
get a "good" job, enter college, etc.

A granduncle born in St. Petersburg c. 1880, married an Irish girl in
Chicago around 1902.  The family was devastated.  But they were
consoled by a little bundle of joy arriving about 6 or 7 months after
the wedding.  (This was found by researchers thru Jewishgen; the
generations of my family coming after that date never knew about it.) 
  Another example: *Oscar Venceslas De Lubicz-Milosz*, 1877–1939),
French poet, mystical writer, and diplomat. Milosz, who was born in
Chereya, Belorussia to a Lithuanian nobleman and the baptized daughter
of a Warsaw Hebrew tIeacher....
In the introduction to his poetry in Lithuanian I read that his father a
Polish cavalry officer in the Russian service, rode through  a village,
and his eyes met the eyes of a beautiful Jewish maiden. He swept her off
her feet and rode off with her.  Let us not forget eros as a motivation
for intermarriage!

Jules Levin

Los Angeles



Janet Furba
 

On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 11:55 AM, Cliff Karchmer wrote:
The intermarriages were not forbidden. But one of the two had to change his or her confession because there were then only religious marriages recognized by the State.
Janet Furba, Germany


Sarah L Meyer
 

In the 19th century Jews married Christians either for marriage or to protect their family from antisemitism or for economic reasons - to get a "good" job, enter college, etc.

--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Cliff,

I found you question interesting, and while searching for some info on the subject I found this book (I have not read it.)
Confessions of the Shtetl. Converts from Judaism in Imperial Russia, 1817-1906 by Ellie R. Schainker
This site has a detailed commentary on the book, which on its own is interesting.
https://www.europenowjournal.org/2017/08/01/confessions-of-the-shtetl-converts-from-judaism-in-imperial-russia-1817-1906/

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish


Cliff Karchmer
 

Hi Linda!  Thanks for your reply.  To make sure I understand you, like the Conversos, are you suggesting the converstion was not an actuaol embrace of another religion--but make to appear so for social and political reasons?  I could understand that.  My underlying question is whether such a marriage to a Christian would, under Russian law, protect those assets from something--like taxation?  Czarist confiscation? Please let me know if you can further enlighten me.

Cliff Karchmer.


Lin Mor
 

Even though my maternal grandfather's brother converted to Russian Orthodox for "business reasons" in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, his descendants identify as Jewish. Consider the possibility that the conversion served as the "public religion." Think about the Conversos of Spain and Portugal, I think perhaps there are some similarities here, but with nowhere as dire consequences.

Linda Cohen Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

 

Researching:

 

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelets and Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany and France

KOSOFSKY in Shchuchyn, near Lida, Belarus

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Cliff Karchmer
 

Hello.  A colleague with a Jewish ancestor told me she heard that her Jewish grandmother from Lvov married a Christian (Russian Orthodox) to preserve wealthy family assets.  Could that have been a legitimate reason for intermarriage in the 19th century?  If so, what were the advantages that could compel a Jew to protect assets in such an extreme way?  thanks for your advice. Feel free to reply to me directly:  ckarchmer@...
 
Thanks,
 
Cliff Karchmer