Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names


Barbara Singer
 

I do not know if they are nicknames, however, there was quite a famous
stage & film star - the Yuddish stage first -.  his stage name was Paul Muni.
His name was Muni Weisenfreund

Barbara Singer Meis


Frank Schulaner
 

Since many of those nicknamed Muni were remembered as soccer/football players, could they have earned that nickname playing for the local--"municipal"--league?
--Frank Schulaner, Kealakekua HI


Diane Jacobs
 

Using JOWBR on Jewishgen and FindAGrave
for other cemeteries in the NYC area, you might get lucky and find him in another cemetery.

Diane Jacobs


On Apr 13, 2021, at 4:29 PM, sjgwed via groups.jewishgen.org <sjgwed=aol.com@...> wrote:

My interest in the name, "Moni," and variations is inspired by what I've been reading in the recently published Memorial Book of Skalat.

The stories in the book were recounted and recorded by survivors who gave their testimonies over time. I had read parts of the book online, previously, because Skalat is one of my ancestral homes, and I've been wondering about "Moni Lempert," "M. Lempert" (and other names for this man, who was a member of the Judenrat.) He, along with other "delegates, Nirler, Schoenberg," and "Zimmer: (aka "pillars of the Skalat Judenrat" met with "Muller," whom I believe was head of the Gestapo stationed in nearby Tarnopol.

My concern is... is this "Lempert" a relative of mine (even a distant one)? In 1942, when he was "responsible for the Labor office," he was instructed by the Gestapo to round up a certain number of Jews, and he "received a cash payment from the Judenrat for being the first to bring in all the people on his list: 100%.

My immediate family - maternal great grandparents, their 6 children - including my grandmother - all had left Galicia by the end of the 19th century. Their name, "Lempert," was soon changed to "Lambert." 

I have visited my great grandparents' graves in the "Skalater Section" of Mt. Zion cemetery in Maspeth, New York, and have confirmed that other Lemperts (and Lamberts) are buried there, too. But none has a name that begins with "M."

M. Lempert had been responsible for the deaths of other Jews, even though it's likely that he did not have a choice. He and other Judenrat members had been leaders in the ghetto, and in various testimonies, they are remembered as ones who "gained infamy by their evil acts."

What happened to him? Did he die in a camp? Did he survive the Holocaust and come to the US?...

How do we, as researchers and chroniclers of our families' pasts, handle this? Have other Jewish Genners run into this problem?

Thanks, already, for so many great responses. 

Susan Gordon
PS: you can read about my search for Muller online, in "'Hunting a Dead Nazi,' Susan J. Gordon."
sjgwed@...
www.becauseofeva.com
LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT - Skalat, Lvov
BIALAZURKER - Zbaraz, Budapest

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Henry Carrey Boston,MA . Carey/Kirzhner/Berestyaner , Belous , Isenberg - Lutsk ; Postolov/Herman/Kolovsky-Zhitomir
 

From looking at the Jewish Given names data bases in Jewish Gen and Ancestry for several countries such as Russia, Poland and Ukraine , the most common  male Hebrew names for Muni/Manya/Moni/Munke Mendl came out as 
Emanual , Menachem , Mordechai and Asher .  I could find only Marina as a female variant of Manya but no Yiddish or Hebrew derivation. . 

if Manya is a common nickname in Slavic countries  for Maria or Marina  , it might make sense that a Jewish woman might be given a non-Jewish local name like my friend , the singer Masha Benya , who was born at the beginning of the 20th century in Lithuania .  They might have been named after a relative named Miriam , Mirl or even Malka.  
--
Henry H. Carrey


sjgwed@...
 

My interest in the name, "Moni," and variations is inspired by what I've been reading in the recently published Memorial Book of Skalat.

The stories in the book were recounted and recorded by survivors who gave their testimonies over time. I had read parts of the book online, previously, because Skalat is one of my ancestral homes, and I've been wondering about "Moni Lempert," "M. Lempert" (and other names for this man, who was a member of the Judenrat.) He, along with other "delegates, Nirler, Schoenberg," and "Zimmer: (aka "pillars of the Skalat Judenrat" met with "Muller," whom I believe was head of the Gestapo stationed in nearby Tarnopol.

My concern is... is this "Lempert" a relative of mine (even a distant one)? In 1942, when he was "responsible for the Labor office," he was instructed by the Gestapo to round up a certain number of Jews, and he "received a cash payment from the Judenrat for being the first to bring in all the people on his list: 100%.

My immediate family - maternal great grandparents, their 6 children - including my grandmother - all had left Galicia by the end of the 19th century. Their name, "Lempert," was soon changed to "Lambert." 

I have visited my great grandparents' graves in the "Skalater Section" of Mt. Zion cemetery in Maspeth, New York, and have confirmed that other Lemperts (and Lamberts) are buried there, too. But none has a name that begins with "M."

M. Lempert had been responsible for the deaths of other Jews, even though it's likely that he did not have a choice. He and other Judenrat members had been leaders in the ghetto, and in various testimonies, they are remembered as ones who "gained infamy by their evil acts."

What happened to him? Did he die in a camp? Did he survive the Holocaust and come to the US?...

How do we, as researchers and chroniclers of our families' pasts, handle this? Have other Jewish Genners run into this problem?

Thanks, already, for so many great responses. 

Susan Gordon
PS: you can read about my search for Muller online, in "'Hunting a Dead Nazi,' Susan J. Gordon."
sjgwed@...
www.becauseofeva.com
LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT - Skalat, Lvov
BIALAZURKER - Zbaraz, Budapest


Gary
 

Now that we're wandering a bit further afield on names, I am reminded the same ggp who had the sister named Manya (or Maria) had another sister (Ida) whose husband apparently was killed in WWII serving in the Russian Army. Ida gave his name as "Musia" (or at least the name was translated that way) in the set of post-war letters I have. Wondering what Musia could be a nickname or variant of, as that might help me look up Ida's husband in the Russian Army databases.

Thanks,
Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY


Jerry Scherer
 

Here's my father's story. There are some similarities to Paul Gottlieb's father.

My father was born in 1909 in Kuty, Galicia. He lived and went to school in Vienna, Austria from 1920 until 1930. From 1930 to !941, he worked as an accountant in Stanislawow, Poland, In 1941, he was sent to Siberia by the Red Army. He worked there in the forced labor camps and in the munition factory until 1946. From 1946 to1949, we were in the DP camp in Hofgeismar, Germany. 

My father's Yiddish/Hebrew name was Moishe. Other names and nicknames used were Maurycy, Munya, Misha and Morris. He was always called by family and friends as Munya and Misha.


Jerry Scherer
Toronto, Canada


Paul Gottlieb
 

My father was born in 1901. His home was in Kuty, Galicia, Austro-Hungary at the time, later Poland, now Ukraine.
His first name was Moses, probably Moishe. At some point, his nickname became Munio.
Perhaps revealingly, after he moved to Vienna and became a successful businessman, he formerly
changed his first name (in the mid-1930's) to Maximilian, the first name of a former Austro-Hungarian emperor. 
But his nickname always remained Munio, even after he came to America.
Happy to hear any thoughts about this or similar stories.

Paul Gottlieb
New York City
psgottlieb@...


de.ewenczyk@...
 

My father Samuel had two brothers : Osher / Oscar and Emmanuel. Their family lived not far from Minsk.
Their parent called them Sioma (Samuel), Ossia (Osher / Oscar) and Monia (Emmanuel).
So, Emmanuel is a possibility for Munia. 


Daniel Ewenczyk 
Paris, France
Searching Ewenczyk / Evenczyk (Bélarus), Rezepter (Ukraine), Elie (Romania)


stahlshifra
 

In my husband's family (from Kolomyya), Munya is Mordechai.
 
Shifra Stahl
 


Jules Levin
 

On 4/11/2021 5:41 AM, stalactit via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Hello,

My maternal grandmother’s official name was Maria Solomonovna
 PRITIKINA  (Russian spelling: Мария Соломоновна Притыкина) 1903-1974
from Oster, Ukraine. But everybody called her Mania ( Manya, Маня). I
wouldn’t know how her father was nicknamed but she named one of her
son’s Solomon, after him and everybody called him Monia or Mon’ka
(Monya, Моня, Монька)
--
Jane DOROGOYER

Researching
LANDSMAN from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus;
SHEININ from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus, Kyiv, Russia;
PRITIKIN from Oster, Ukraine;
KRONFELD from Bessarabia;
DOROGOYER from Bessarabia.


stalactit@...
 

Hello,

My maternal grandmother’s official name was Maria Solomonovna  PRITIKINA  (Russian spelling: Мария Соломоновна Притыкина) 1903-1974 from Oster, Ukraine. But everybody called her Mania ( Manya, Маня). I wouldn’t know how her father was nicknamed but she named one of her son’s Solomon, after him and everybody called him Monia or Mon’ka (Monya, Моня, Монька)
--
Jane DOROGOYER

Researching 
LANDSMAN from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus;
SHEININ from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus, Kyiv, Russia;
PRITIKIN from Oster, Ukraine;
KRONFELD from Bessarabia;
DOROGOYER from Bessarabia.


Lee Jaffe
 

I've been following the exchange with a lot of interest because it touches the identities of three relatives I'm trying to trace. 

I have two mystery relatives listed in the family tree passed on to me, siblings of my great-grandmother Dora Koshkin, one a sister, Mayna and the other a brother, Munya.  The Koshkins came from Snovsk, Chernigov, Ukraine.  Most of the family emigrated in the early 1900s but, as far as I know, neither Mayna and Munya came to the US.  I have no records or documents of their lives and for awhile wondered if they were actually one person whose name was transcribed incorrectly in the family tree.  I've since found family photos with Munya and Mayna labeled separately.  :-)

I also have a 2x great-grandfather whose name is recorded as Manis on his son's marriage license and מאניש on the same son's gravestone.  The son, my great-grandfather Joseph Schwartz, is listed on a couple of other family trees where it says his father's name was Emanuel.  A number of posts in this thread suggest that Manis is a derivative of Emanuel but I've always assumed that it was the other way around: that Emanuel was a Westernized rendering of whatever Manis stood for, probably Menachem. I don't know where Manis or Joseph came from but my best guess, at the moment, is Ternivka, Ukraine.

Lee

--

Lee David Jaffe

Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland

 


mvayser@...
 

Manya is a nickname for Maria in Russian and Ukrainian and possibly some other Slavic languages.  It's likely that the full name was Mariem, Maria, or similar.

Mike Vayser


Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
 

The female name that is phonetically "Manya" is the first name of my husband's paternal grandmother, who lived in Galicia.

We, too, do not know what the origin of the name is and have wondered about it, since we thought it did not seem to resonate as a Jewish name.

Autosomal DNA testing does confirm, however, that three of her grandchildren, who are children of two of her male children, are categorized by the DNA vendors as Ashkenazi Jews at a very high percentage.

Ellen Zyroff


On Friday, April 9, 2021, 12:36:42 PM PDT, Gary via groups.jewishgen.org <electromd=verizon.net@...> wrote:


I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY

--
ZOLOTOROV (Chernigov, Ukraine; Kiev, Ukraine);
SLOTOROFF (Kiev, Ukraine)
CHARKOVSKY or SHARKOVSKY(Ukraine);
LEVINE (Ukraine and Minsk, Belarus);
GLUSKIN (Ukraine)
LIMON (Berestechko, Volynia, Ukraine)
TESLER (Horochiv, Volynia, Ukraine)
ZYRO (Zabolativ, Ukraine) 
TAU (Zalolativ, Ukraine)
PISTERMAN (Ukraine)
ROTH / ROT (Ataki, Bessarabia, Moldova)
BLAUSTEIN (Chernigov, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus)


Gary
 

I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY


hfark29@...
 

Muni in our family was a nickname for Shimon.....(in Israel.)
Heidi Farkash 


mamabirdlouise@...
 

Munya and Muni are diminutives of Emmanuel; they may be for other names, as well.  The late father of a friend was called "Muni" and his name was Emmanuel.
--
Louise Goldstein

 


NTalbot
 

I also had a female first 2X cousin Muna Neger from Dynow. I am not aware of Muna being a nickname for another name. Sadly she was shot by a Nazi holding her twin baby girls, also killed.
--
NTalbot
Brooklyn, NY
ninaitalbot@...

NEGER, SPINRAD (Dynow, Poland)
TOLPEN (Suchostaw, Poland/Sukhostav, Ukraine)
DISTENFELD, ADLER, WILDER (Kamionka Strumilowa, Poland/Kamianka-Buzka, Ukraine)


Rick Luftglass
 

From everyone’s responses here, it sounds like Muni and Munya were often males. Interesting that my Munya/Munia/Muni, was a female - my great aunt.  She was born in 1885 in Bogopol, in the Podolia region in today’s Ukraine, and moved to Montreal. Her formal first name was Anna.

But perhaps that was an anomaly. 

Rick Luftglass