Jews with Christian names #names


Gail H. Marcus
 

I had a similar experience.  We were traveling and were invited to the home of someone in Australia who we didn't know as part of a program for visitors to the country to get to know some locals.  Our hostess threw open the door to greet us and immediately asked, "What is your Christian name?"  I had never heard the expression before, but I guess it was obvious, because I furrowed my brow and said, "Do you mean my given name?  It's Gail."  The moment passed without further discussion.

Gail Marcus
Bethesda, MD


Paul King
 

Your brief remarks on first name acquisition in Prussia prior to 1850 raise some critical questions. Did the state give names or were parents free to choose names? Naming a child after a monarch was common in some European countries such as Bohemia and would be in the spirit of honorific surnames such Baron, Prinz or Graf. Biblical names from the New Testament were also common, often drawn from restrictive name lists. Some choices such as Mary Magdalena, however, do appear astonishing, especially when the father was a community slaughterer well-versed in Jewish ritual. Did other German principalities follow the first name regulations of Prussia?

Paul King
Jerusalem 


David Harrison
 

The usage of "Christian Name" for "Given Name" was normal in Britain but started to die in about 1975.  Round about that year official documents started to change from the one to the other when asking for the given names for passports or for candidates to be elected to public Office and later on for Clubs and societies.  I remember a friend of my wife  (her husband was the Dean of one of our three Cathedrals) asked me "Mr Harrison what is your Christian Name?"  To which I replied "I have not got one, Ruth, but my first name is David.' likewise in about1995 a Skiing Instructor made a similar request and at the end of that course handed me a course completion certificate which stated Christian Name David; I handed it back saying "i told you that I am Jewish and do not have a Christian Name"  That summer I met him again and he told me that the awarding club had discussed this at their AGM and were not making any change to their certificates.  I therefore reported this to the SYHA who had organised that course. I do not think that any religion has as much as 50% of the population of Birmingham, we have many sorts of Christians at least 4 types of Jew, a variety of different versions of Islam, Sikhs, Hindus and Buddhists, Humanists and my old University has had a Pagan Chaplain for a couple of years.
David Harrison, Birmingham, England
( The three Cathedrals are Protestant, Catholic and Greek Orthodox)


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Sarah L Meyer <sarahlmeyer@...>
Sent: 13 April 2021 14:13
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Jews with Christian names #names
 
I believe that the quote was taken out of context.  The original comment was made by a non-Jewish woman who referred to first names or given names as "Christian names" and the comment was that we do not use "Christian names", we do use first names or given names.  The discussion was not which first/given names are "Christian", in the original post the reference was to all  given names.
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Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Sarah L Meyer
 

I believe that the quote was taken out of context.  The original comment was made by a non-Jewish woman who referred to first names or given names as "Christian names" and the comment was that we do not use "Christian names", we do use first names or given names.  The discussion was not which first/given names are "Christian", in the original post the reference was to all  given names.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Alan Cohen
 

It is often forgotten that Jesus as well as his close followers were all Jewish. So it is not surprising that Jews are occasionally given the same names. It is the modern Christians who have, in the trendy phrase, culturately oppropriated the names. I had a cousin named Paul zl who was definitely Jewish and of Ukrainian origin. 

Alan Cohen


Dr. Ruth Leiserowitz
 

In Prussia, until 1850, it was forbidden by the state to give Jews names such as "Friedrich" and "Wilhelm" (names of Prussian kings), as well as distinctly Christian names such as Peter, Paul, Christian, Maria, etc. In later decades, these strict regulations no longer applied.

Ruth Leiserowitz
Berlin / Warsaw


Max Heffler
 

I do not think Berman is goyish. All Berman's I have known were Jewish.

Max Heffler
Houston, TX


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Emily Olson via groups.jewishgen.org <gardyloo1=gmail.com@...>
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 10:41 AM
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Jews with Christian names #names #general
 
I can think offhand of three famous-ish Jews named Christopher. You can’t get more goyish than that. Christopher Berman, Christopher Wallace and Christopher Guest.

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Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


Emily Olson
 

I can think offhand of three famous-ish Jews named Christopher. You can’t get more goyish than that. Christopher Berman, Christopher Wallace and Christopher Guest.


Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Someone wrote that "jews do not give their children names". I know several Orthodox families who gave their children names such as Peter or Paul. True that one of these families were of German jewish stock where i presume the phenomenon was more prevelant than by eastern european jews.


Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem