Immigration via Hoboken? #usa


Stephen Weinstein
 

On Thu, Apr 22, 2021 at 03:11 PM, Joel Weintraub wrote:
The port however should be the Port of New York... that is
The official name is now the Port of New York and New Jersey.  I'm not sure when it changed.  Probably when the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was established in 1921.
 
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Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...


Stephen Weinstein
 

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 09:53 AM, <laurie.budgar@...> wrote:
the ship would have gone through Ellis Island
The "ship" would not have gone through Ellis Island.  The third class (steerage) passengers would have.  But the transatlantic ships themselves docked elsewhere, and the third class (steerage) passengers were brought to Ellis Island on ferries.
 
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Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...


Laurie Budgar
 

Thanks to everyone who responded. It makes a lot more sense knowing the ship would have gone through Ellis Island. Unfortunately, as Janette points out, the ship did not dock in NY at any time in the month of September 1898. The information my ancestor (Abraham Winokur) provided is obviously unreliable, as Joel noted would be likely. I did browse through the manifest for the ship's Aug 23 1898 landing, page by page, and did not find his name. I cannot find it on any indexed list, either (including the one David suggested). It may be a very tedious process of browsing through all the ship's landings from that year and 1899. (Why only those two years? His son Hyman was allegedly born in Russia in August 1898, and I know Abraham is in the US by 1900 (appears on the census and reports year of immigration as 1898). I doubt he would have traveled first or second class, though. 

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA


Janette Silverman
 

The Friederich der grosse landed in the Port of New York on 23 August. It took about 10 days for the sailing. It is unlikely that it returned to Europe and made it back to the U.S. by 12 Sep 1898. If a passenger was traveling steerage, they would have gone through Ellis Island, whether their ship docked at New York or Hoboken. After clearing the various check-ups on Ellis Island, they would have taken the ferry back to either New York or Hoboken. There's a great article from 2014  at http://hmag.com/port-entry-continent/
Janette Silverman
Phoenix, AZ and Salt Lake City, UT

 


Judy Floam
 

I took a Holland-America student ship from Hoboken when I went to Europe in my ‘20s.   The year would have been 1962.

 

Judy Floam

Baltimore, MD

 


A. E. Jordan
 




-----Original Message-----
From: laurie.budgar@...

I just received my great-granduncle's naturalization records. They indicate he immigrated through the port of Hoboken on 12 Sep 1898 on the ship Frederick der Grosse. I've never heard of immigrating through this port, 




Hoboken NJ is part of the port complex of New York in the eyes of the immigration folks and the passenger lists are in the NYC records. Immigrants would still go through Ellis Island or the Barge office depending on time or processed on the dock when they were traveling in the higher classes of the ship. Ships going to New York and New Jersey all came through the same route called The Narrows and they would stop at the the immigration point for clearances.

Hoboken is on the west side of the Hudson River so the ship made a left coming north on the river instead of turning right to Manhattan or Brooklyn.

The German shipping companies used the docks in Hoboken and Brooklyn for many years and Holland-America Line went to Hoboken till the 1960s. (If you ever see the movie On the Waterfront, that is the Hoboken docks and a Holland America liner from the 1950s is in some of the scenes.)

Allan Jordan
(a maritime historian as well as a genealogist)
New York


Joel Weintraub
 

I sent a short message to Laurie about the “port” of Hoboken.  Hoboken had docks for the Hamburg-America Line, and perhaps berthed other ships as well.  The port however should be the Port of New York... that is, Ellis Island.  The important part of the message is that the arrival was shown on the naturalization papers to be 1898.  She should check for the ship arrivals page at stevemorse.org to see if it actually did arrive on Sept. 12th, 1898.  Any arrival information before 1905, when immigration authorities had to certify ship arrival information on the Certificate of Arrival during the naturalization process  should be considered suspect.  I suggested to Laurie that she throw away her assumptions about the arrival information, and concentrate on Ellis Island arrivals.  However, if the person came on first or second class, those manifests from 1897 to 1902 are missing from Ellis Island.
Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA



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Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA


Diane Jacobs
 

Try. Go to stevemorse.org
And in the first section of passenger manifests 
click on The Ships List.
Plunk in the name of the ship and the month and year it arrived . If your sailing comes up,
Then you can go through each manifest page to find the entry you want.

Hope this helps . 
Diane Jacobs


On Apr 22, 2021, at 1:59 PM, laurie.budgar@... wrote:

I just received my great-granduncle's naturalization records. They indicate he immigrated through the port of Hoboken on 12 Sep 1898 on the ship Frederick der Grosse. I've never heard of immigrating through this port, but apparently it did happen in this time frame. Still, I'm stumped as to where to find his passenger manifest. I've looked on Ancestry and Family Search as well as the NARA website, but have not found any records for this port. Does anyone know where I might access them? Thanks in advance!

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Susan&David
 

See if the records are here:
U.S., Atlantic Ports Arriving and Departing Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1873 and 1893 - 1959
https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/8758/

David Rosen
Boston, AM


On 4/22/2021 12:54 PM, laurie.budgar@... wrote:
I just received my great-granduncle's naturalization records. They indicate he immigrated through the port of Hoboken on 12 Sep 1898 on the ship Frederick der Grosse. I've never heard of immigrating through this port, but apparently it did happen in this time frame. Still, I'm stumped as to where to find his passenger manifest. I've looked on Ancestry and Family Search as well as the NARA website, but have not found any records for this port. Does anyone know where I might access them? Thanks in advance!

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA


Laurie Budgar
 

I just received my great-granduncle's naturalization records. They indicate he immigrated through the port of Hoboken on 12 Sep 1898 on the ship Frederick der Grosse. I've never heard of immigrating through this port, but apparently it did happen in this time frame. Still, I'm stumped as to where to find his passenger manifest. I've looked on Ancestry and Family Search as well as the NARA website, but have not found any records for this port. Does anyone know where I might access them? Thanks in advance!

Laurie Budgar
Longmont, CO, USA