Danzig residential registration cards R-Z now online #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany


viferra@outlook.com
 

I want to thank Logan for this post.  I accessed it (there is an option to use it in English) and searched for my family name Furstenberg (with an umlaut).  Nothing under Fur, but when I looked under Fuer..., I found a card(front and back) that I believe is my family.  It's difficult to read, but the names are correct.  When I have more time, I'm going to have to see what I can figure out.  So if you don't find your name under your first spelling attempt, don't give up!

Best,


Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi

Belmont, California


researching: FUERSTENBERG (Gdansk, Berlin, Shanghai) ;
PROCHOWNIK (Bydgoszcz, Berlin, Shanghai); QUIATOWSKY (Berlin, Ujest/Ujazd))

BAUM (Gdansk); FREYSTADT (Berlin, Sweden); HEYMANN (Berlin, Israel, Geneva)

SCHULVALTER (Berlin, Brazil); SILBERSTEIN/SILVER (Gdansk, Chicago)


Logan Kleinwaks
 

The Polish State Archives in Gdańsk recently posted online more scans of residential registration cards 1843-1918, these covering previously missing cards for surnames beginning with R-Z.
 
To view the cards, go to:
 
https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/seria?p_p_id=Seria&p_p_lifecycle=0&p_p_state=normal&p_p_mode=view&_Seria_delta=1000&_Seria_nameofjsp=jednostki&_Seria_resetCur=false&_Seria_id_serii=678254&_Seria_cur=1
 
Then, scroll down and/or page forward (links at bottom) to find the alphabetical group of interest, click on the group to show small images of the scans, and click on a small image to enlarge it. When viewing a large image, you will see a download link on the right (downward arrow and "Pobierz") and left and right arrows to view the previous/next large image. The site is sometimes slow to display the large images. (A "trick" to navigate faster: while viewing the grid of small images, enlarge/zoom your web browser's display and you can often read the surnames at the top of the cards without having to load the large images.) If you find a card of interest, make sure you check adjacent scans as there are often two scans, front and back, for each card.
 
On the cards, you can find a wealth of genealogical information about an entire household, including birth dates and places, maiden names, death dates and places, addresses in Danzig, and places people moved to from Danzig. Some of the later cards include the head of household's parents' names near the top. There is often enough information in these cards to identify the same people in other Jewish records from Danzig, even from the pre-surname period (for a summary of other census-like sources and vital records being transcribed, see https://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/records-chart.php).
 
If you might like to volunteer to transcribe 18th-20th century Danzig records written in old German writing (Kurrent), or if you are an expert at reading challenging old Hebrew cursive, please email me directly.
 
Logan Kleinwaks
JewishGen Research Director for Danzig/Gdańsk