Use of English by European Photo Studios #general


Emily Rosenberg
 

I cant answer your question but if you want to see some absolutely stunning 19th century daguerreotype  portraits look at the exhibibition online from the National Portrait Gallery of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC. You will see how much personality and clothing detail was revealed by a master photographer. 

“Warranted to Give Satisfaction”: Daguerreotypes by Jeremiah Gurney

--
Emily Rosenberg
Oakland, California

KESNER in Amsterdam, London, Chicago
STODEL in Amsterdam, London, USA
KAWIN in Suwalki and Poland
RUBINSKY in Suwalki and Poland


Ava (Sherlock) Cohn
 

The use of the words "Cabinet Card" "Cabinet Portrait" or "Cabinet Photograph" are generic terms for the type of photographic mounting that measures roughly 4 1/4" x 6 1/2". It does not refer to the image itself but to the card, though in common usage,  many people will refer to the entire card including the image as a "Cabinet Card". The terms, though in English, were universally used so that they do not indicate a specific country. They also do not necessarily indicate that a particular photographer was itinerant or had a studio, unless the studio name is also printed on the card, either on the front or the back or both sides. Photographers bought these cards in bulk from card manufacturers. Cabinet cards were introduced in America in 1866 and were used in Russia at least until the first decade of the 20th century. Ava (Sherlock) Cohn, Illinois


Krzysztof Witaszek
 

Surely yes. I have some photos taken in Russia in that time with  printed words just  "Cabinet Portrait".
 I am not sure but it looks like the stationary studios had its own cards with name and address and itinerant photographers  used the universal cards  with  printed  only "Cabinet portrait" and some graphics.
 
Krzysztof Witaszek
Lublin


Eva Lawrence
 

If portraits probably taken Europe are printed what appears to be
English stock, I'd assume that they were prints from the original film,
made later on in England. You have to remember that photographic
technique was quite different in pre-digital times.
Eva Lawrence,
St Albans, UK.
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Robert Hanna
 

I have several of those.  The ones I have that have English printing on them were taken on the lower east side in NYC.

Robert Hanna
NYC


Beth Galleto
 

Dear Rusty,
The Cabinet Portrait was a type of photograph, also called cabinet card, that could have been made in many countries. I have a number of them, identified with the Russian photography studio in which they were made, in the collection of family photos my grandmother saved. 
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabinet_card#:~:text=The%20cabinet%20card%20was%20a,61%E2%81%842%20inches).
Beth Galleto
Washington DC


Rusty Wilson
 

I have several early 20th century photos printed on card stock with the words "Cabinet Portrait" in English.  But it would make sense that some of these photos were taken in Europe.  Does anyone know if European photographers ever used English printing on their card stock? 
 
Any input appreciated.  
 
Rusty Wilson
Researching:
KRASNY
PLOTKIN
OBUKOWSKY
KARNOWSKY

 
--
Rusty Wilson
Rusty.Wilson1@...