I wish to hire a DNA analyst to interpret the results of a Big Y-700 FTDNA Sample #dna


Jay Willoughby
 

Dear Friends at JewishGen:

I am a goy, a Judaphile and a family historian.  My J-G member ID is 443058.

I would like to hire a Y-DNA specialist to analyze the results of a Big
Y-700 FTDNA Sample and produce a detailed report, in narrative form.  In
the following, I offer details of the Jewish subject which might lead to
an analyst already familiar with the surname and/or city of birth.

My son-in-law's father, Dr Benjamin Franklin, was the Y-DNA sampler,
born in Atlanta, GA in 1919.  The paternal grandfather was an Ashkenazi
Jewish immigrant born c1880 in the Pinsk, Russia area. G-father arrived
at Ellis Island c1906.  He immediately took the name of Louis Franklin
without legal process and his original Jewish name is uncertain.  The
surname Frankel has surfaced as a possibility.

 I am certain that the right person will be found through JewishGen. I
look forward to your reply.  Please correspond through my gmail
address.  Thank You!

Jay Willoughby
                                        jayawiloby@... Tel. (314)
920-9190


Jeffrey Herrmann
 

It is sad that FTDNA does not explain their Big Y-700 in plain language, forcing customers to hire experts to interpret the results.  FTDNA’s “Big Y-700 White Paper” offers these gems of technospeak to its customers:
”Very few nucleotides are spanned by 200 fragments, and so the fraction of the target covered at that depth is low as well.”
”Fragments that added depth to already confidently called regions in Big Y span new regions of chrY in Big Y-700.”
”The total number of SNPs called in a bin is shown by the dotted black trace which uses the log scale on the right-hand axis.”
”We used BY101* sample … as an outgroup to eliminate all variants at the Bay101 level and above.”
Does anyone find this helpful in making sense of their Big Y-700 results?
Is there a plain language guide to understanding Big Y-700 test results without the aid of the priestly class of paid experts?
Jeffrey Herrmann
New Rochelle, NY
researching Herschel of Hamburg 


peggyfreedman@...
 

You can get advice about interpreting a Y DNA kit from the Avotaynu DNA Project team.

In order to do this, Log into the Y DNA kit
Hover the curson on GROUP PROJECTS in the top menu bar
A menu dropdown box should appear, click on JOIN A PROJECT
Type AVOTAYNU in the Search by Surname block
Join the project

If you go to the website for the project at:
Avotaynu DNA Project (avotaynuonline.com)
you will see that there is an email address to contact with questions about your match.

As you have indicated that you have a Big Y 700 test, they should be glad to point you in the right direction!  Adam Brown has given a number of lectures about results from their work that are fascinating.  You can see some of them by searching YouTube for "Adam Brown DNA".

Best Regards,
Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, GA USA


Raina Accardi
 

The Big-Y is for granular assignment of your particular Y mutations place in the Y-tree. It can tell you general migrations and locations of the populations who had those same mutations or derivations of same. If you are trying to identify the subject's original surname, the Big Y test may not help. Ashkenazi only took surnames in the last 200 years or so. The Y-DNA tests, including the Big Y, look back at DNA from 2000 years ago and more... Finding a match in a more recent time frame is a huge long shot since the database of samples is pretty small. You should use the at-DNA (Family Finder) test which will give you matches who may be able to shed light on related surnames and locations within a genealogical time frame of about 6 generations. 

 

--
Raina Accardi 
Saugerties, NY
RAgenealogy@...
Poland: GEVIRTZMAN in Kobylin; JESINOWITZ/YESNOWITZ in Mszczonów; FELSENSTEIN in Parysów.
Belarus: GUTTWOCH/GOODMAN and ZISSERMAN in Volchin; BUSHMITZ in Vysokaye.
Ukraine: TRAUB and JANOVSKY in Kolki, Sofievka, Radomysl, and Zhytomyr; WEISMAN or ROSENBERG.


Mary D. Taffet
 

It * IS * possible to limit the number of Y-DNA markers that you look
for matches on, even if 700 were tested.  You can limit it to 35
markers, 67 markers, or 111 markers, and have a much better chance of
finding surname matches.

And yes, it is a good idea to also use the Family Finder test as well,
along with the Y-DNA test.

-- Mary D. Taffet
    Syracuse, NY
    mdtaffet@...


On 8/13/21 11:54 AM, Raina Accardi wrote:
The Big-Y is for granular assignment of your particular Y mutations
place in the Y-tree. It can tell you general migrations and locations
of the populations who had those same mutations or derivations of
same. If you are trying to identify the subject's original surname,
the Big Y test may not help. Ashkenazi only took surnames in the last
200 years or so. The Y-DNA tests, including the Big Y, look back at
DNA from 2000 years ago and more... Finding a match in a more recent
time frame is a huge long shot since the database of samples is pretty
small. You should use the at-DNA (Family Finder) test which will give
you matches who may be able to shed light on related surnames and
locations within a genealogical time frame of about 6 generations.


Jeffrey Herrmann
 

The Big Y tests (500 and then 700) place the tester’s Y-DNA at the end of a twig on a small branch of a larger branch of a still larger branch etc of the Y-DNA tree.  Some lucky testers will discover that there are other testers on their tiny twig, and those other testers may be relatives within genealogical time (or not).  For most of us, I suspect, we will just find ourselves alone on our own little twig.  For me, Big Y has been genealogically useless, but for others it has been helpful.  For all of us, it would be nice if FTDNA provided a plain language explanation for how to interpret the data, which FTDNA displays in a quirky manner.  We shouldn’t have to hire experts to tell us what it means.
Jeffrey Herrmann
New Rochelle, NY


adina@...
 

Hi Jay,
Big Y is very unlikely to give you the answer that you seek. If you want to determine a possible surname, it's going to take paper trail research and potentially an autosomal DNA test. If the individual came in as Franklin according to records, my experience tells me someone came here before him and adopted that surname.

If DNA is of interest, I'd recommend a test at Ancestry and then upload to FTDNA, MyHeritage, and Gedmatch.

Hope that helps.

Adina Newman
Sharon, MA
adina@...