What is this Hebrew name? #names


neilan1
 

Correction - The (misspelled) name does not have to "live into perpetuity". A cousin of mine,who lived alone, had passed away some time ago. When I visited the cemetery and saw her matzevah, (headstone), I realized that the attorney, who had handled the arrangements, had supplied  the wrong Hebrew names for both the deceased, and her father. After I interceded, the monument company somehow made the correct changes to the stone in a manner that the changes were not readily apparent.

Neilan Stern      neilan1@...
researching: Stern, Pistrong, Stieglitz - Radomysl Wielki;  Aonov/wsky, Cohen - Vilijampole, Kovno, Lithuania; Black, Schwarz - Nesvizh, Belarus


David Harrison
 

Dear Peter Cohen (and others)
Surely, a year after the interment when the headstone was set, a member of that congregation (such as the Rabbi or surviving family) would have noticed the error and had it corrected.
I have the joy of finding the mark of my grandfather on the back of several headstones in London.  He was apprenticed as a Monumental Mason and I have his indentures.  Later he succeeded his father as the Superintendent of a Jewish Cemetry.
David Harrison
Birmingham, England.


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Peter Cohen <peter.cohen@...>
Sent: 18 September 2021 16:52
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] What is this Hebrew name? #names
 
This illustrates the sad fact that the monuments are often engraved by people who do not know the Hebrew alphabet and simply use templates to engrave something that they do not understand.
--
Peter Cohen
California


Yossi Jalas
 

It is most surely Necheh (נעכע) which is a female Yiddish name. Indeed the engraver must have confused the Tzadi with the Ayin as these look quite similar to the untrained eye.

Yossi Jalas
USA


Peter Cohen
 

This illustrates the sad fact that the monuments are often engraved by people who do not know the Hebrew alphabet and simply use templates to engrave something that they do not understand.
--
Peter Cohen
California


Irwin Keller
 

Hi Steven,

Alas, I've seen this a number of times in Jewish cemeteries (including just yesterday). The engraver used a tzade instead of an ayin. They look similar to a non-Hebrew speaker. And the family approved it, not realizing it was wrong. The name should be nun-ayin-chaf-ayin: Neche. Neche bat Natan. 

It's a shame; the error will live into perpetuity! But at least you know what to call her!

Shabbat Shalom

Irwin Keller
Penngrove, CA


Shimona Kushner
 

Dear Steven:  There is an obvious error in the headstone.  There is no Hebrew name with those letters.  The letters as written are "nun", "tzadi", "kaf", "tzadi".  The word you wrote would mean that the second and last letters are "ayins".  However, if you look at the last line on the headstone where it has the abbreviation for "Tehi nishmata netzura betzror hahayim" (may her soul be bound up in the binds of life), the third letter in Hebrew is a "tzadi" which is exactly like what is given in your great aunt's name.  If it would be Neche as you wrote it would not be Hebrew but Yiddish and those two letters would be an "ayin".  Still doesn't sound like any name I am familiar with. Hope this helps.

Shimona Yaroslavsky Kushner, Haifa, Israel


Steven Usdansky
 

Trying to decipher out the given Hebrew name of my great-aunt, Eleanor Walker. My best guess is that it should be נעכע

--
Steven Usdansky
usdanskys@...
Researching USDANSKY (Узданский): Turec, Kapyl, Klyetsk, Nyasvizh, Slutsk, Grosovo; SINIENSKI: Karelichy, Lyubcha, Navahrudak; NAMENWIRTH: Bobowa, Rzepiennik, Gorlice; SIGLER: "Minsk"