Russian army recruits 1880s #general #russia


Odeda Zlotnick
 

In our family, the story was that my paternal gradmother's grandmother made sure that each of her sons would have another surname.  Which is why - said my paternal grandmother - searching form her family by her maiden name was useless, since her dad's surname was "not the right one".
--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


MARC M COHEN
 

My GGF Aron Dovid BARAK KANTORCZY's story with conscription into the Czar's army was a little different from these others.  He was not an only son.  They lived in Khotyn, Bessarabia.  In 1860 when he was 17, he received a draft notice.  Conscription into the army was considered akin to a death sentence.  The entire immediate family fled across the River Prut to the Austrian Empire, settling in Storozynetz, Bukovina. 
 
Marc M. Cohen
Los Gatos, California
 
--

BARAK/CANTORCZY: Khotin, Bessarabia; Strorozhinets, Bukovina, Ukraine; CHOMITZ/HAMETZ: Ionina (Janina), Greece; Ignatovka, Ukraine; Kiev Gubernia, Ukraine
COHEN: Dinovitsi (Dunayevtsy) Ukraine; Roman/Tirgu Frumos, Romania; KORNITZKY: Kiev Gubernia, Stepnitz/Stepantsy, Ukraine
RÎBNER: Storozhinetz, Costesti (Costyntsi), Drachinets, Cabesti, Bukovina, Ukraine
ROSENBERG: Tirgu Frumos, Roman, Romania; ISRAEL; WEININGER: Cabesti, Costesti, Drachinets, Czernowitz, Bukovina, Ukraine


Sarah L Meyer
 

My family story is that my great grandfather bought papers under the name Fishel Meyer to avoid the Czarist conscription.  He came to the US in 1884.  According to family information our original family name was Perchik, and that he had two sisters (1/2) who also came to the US.  One sister has living descendants that match me on DNA as expected based on our original name being Perchik.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Yehuda Berman
 

My father was an only son (he had two sisters) and therefore was entitled to a draft exemption . However, in 1905 when he was 20 his divorced/abandoned (?) mother suddenly died and he lost his exemption. Thereupon he escaped Russia - he had no desire to fight in the war between Russia and Japan - and went to England where he met his estranged father (who had remarried and had 8 more children), and then continued on to the U.S. 
--
Yehuda Berman

Searching BERMAN from Tomashpil, Ukraine and ECHTMAN / ACHTMAN from Odessa, Ukraine


Diane Jacobs
 

If you look at the All Lithuanian Database 
Revision Lists there are many listed as conscripted and sometimes it lists parents and other family members. I have found lots of family that way.

Hope this helps .
Diane Jacobs


On Sep 22, 2021, at 10:50 AM, Jeff Marx <rabjmarx@...> wrote:

Please note that there is also a discussion on Jewish Gen between a number of us about stories concerning family members who maimed themselves to get out of the draft.  I've been collecting these stories and trying to confirm (without, so far, a lot of success) that the maiming actually occurred, and that the real injuries some relatives had were as a result of attempting to avoid the draft.  For important background research, I've found that the "gold standard" of historical research about the Russian draft is  Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern's 2009 book, JEWS IN THE RUSSIAN ARMY, 1827-1917.  Also really good is Olga Litvak's CONSCRIPTION AND THE SEARCH FOR MODERN RUSSIAN JEWRY.  
--
Jeff Marx
Researching ANSPACHER, AUGAPHEL, AUGENBLICK, BREAKSTONE, BREGSTEIN, CARLEBACH, HIEGENLICH, KUBELSKY, MARX

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Lee Jaffe
 

There is a note in the Wikipedia article about conscription in Russia that only sons were not required to serve.  I didn't see anything there specifically about Jews.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscription_in_the_Russian_Empire#1825_to_Milyutin_reforms

Lee
--

Lee David Jaffe

Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland

 


Jeff Marx
 

Please note that there is also a discussion on Jewish Gen between a number of us about stories concerning family members who maimed themselves to get out of the draft.  I've been collecting these stories and trying to confirm (without, so far, a lot of success) that the maiming actually occurred, and that the real injuries some relatives had were as a result of attempting to avoid the draft.  For important background research, I've found that the "gold standard" of historical research about the Russian draft is  Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern's 2009 book, JEWS IN THE RUSSIAN ARMY, 1827-1917.  Also really good is Olga Litvak's CONSCRIPTION AND THE SEARCH FOR MODERN RUSSIAN JEWRY.  
--
Jeff Marx
Researching ANSPACHER, AUGAPHEL, AUGENBLICK, BREAKSTONE, BREGSTEIN, CARLEBACH, HIEGENLICH, KUBELSKY, MARX


Karen ADELMAN
 

My grandfather, Michael Goldsmith/Goldschmidt/Goldschmied told his grandchildren that he had been conscripted into the Russian Army (1900-04) and that he ran away , i.e. went AWOL) in about 1903-04.  I have not been able to figure out how to verify this.
Researching Goldsmith, Goldschmidt, Goldschmied from Volochisk, also Wolfzahn
--
Karen Adelman
karengadelman@...


Karen Lukeman
 

I know of two stories:
  • My brother-in-law's grandfather changed his name from Chorches to Lipman because he didn't want to be drafted.
  • I met someone whose father was "adopted" in Russia by another family because his own (original) family had too many sons and they wanted to protect him.
Karen
--
Karen Calmon Lukeman
KALMANOWITZ (Lyubcha and towns near Grodno, Vilna and Minsk)
GOLDSMITH (Bakshty and Ivje)
NASSER (Damascus)
BENBAJI (Damascus)
BALLAS (Damascus)


Alan Shuchat
 

The term of military service was greatly reduced over the years. See the details at: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscription_in_Russia
--
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka), Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Jill Whitehead
 

At least one of my four great grandparents escaped to Britain in the late 1860's and early 1870's, to escape being called up by the Tsar, and for their fathers possibly being involved in the 1863 Polish Uprising. Once you were enlisted you were in the Russian Army for 25 years. 

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Esta Kawaoka
 

My grandfather and at least one of his brothers fled Russia to escape the Czar.  They went to South Africa in the late 1800’s.  At some point they changed their surname from Itzikowitz to Leon.  I have not been able to find the origin of Leon.  Now I am thinking that maybe they were taken in by a family named Leon.  I have heard that birth records were destroyed.  
Esta Kawaoka


Roberta Berman
 

I have heard and read stories about Jewish brothers living with different families or using different surnames to avoid being in the army in Russia. All of it being anecdotal.

Where can I find proof of this? Is there a Russian law somewhere that states the requirements or exemptions for Jews serving in the army in the 1880s?

Roberta Berman
Sunny Southern California
Researching: OPPENHEIM from Brest-Litovsk; WEISBERG from Kiev; CHAMEIDES.