Tay-Sachs- name used on 19th century European death records? #general #records


Susan Miller
 

What was the named used on 19th century European death records for Tay-Sachs.

Thank you for any and all responses.
Susan Miller
 
Pekar (Rozhiv, Kiev, Ukraine)
Davidov (Pushelot, Pumpenai, Lithuania)
Dorman (Rumsiskes, Ziezmariai, Lithuania/Obukhiv, Kiev, Ukraine)


lydgateaction@...
 

Nothing. It would not have been recognised as a specific disease separate from many other progressive neurological diseases in children (such as Sandhoff, Leigh syndrome and many others, as well as non genetic diseases such as meningitis) until around 1880, and even then most patients would not have been recognised as having a specific identifiable separate disease (that you could translate on a death record) for many decades after that. 

Dr Aubrey Blumsohn

Sheffield, UK


David Lewin
 

At 11:25 09/11/2021, Susan Miller via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:

What was the named used on 19th century European death records for Tay-Sachs.

Thank you for any and all responses.
Susan Miller
 
Pekar (Rozhiv, Kiev, Ukraine)
Davidov (Pushelot, Pumpenai, Lithuania)
Dorman (Rumsiskes, Ziezmariai, Lithuania/Obukhiv, Kiev, Ukraine)
_._,_._,_




Extract From Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tay%E2%80%93Sachs_disease
The disease is named after British ophthalmologist Waren Tay, who in 1881 first described a symptomatic red spot on the retina of the eye; and American neurologist Bernard Sachs, who described in 1887 the cellular changes and noted an increased rate of disease in Ashkenazi Jews. [6] Carriers of a single Tay–Sachs allele are typically normal. [2] It has been hypothesized that being a carrier may confer protection from tuberculosis, explaining the persistence of the allele in certain populations. [7] Researchers are looking at gene therapy or enzyme replacement therapy as possible treatments. [2]

David Lewin
London

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drjjsf@...
 

I found a South African death certificate diagnosis of Amaurotic Familial Idiocy which Merriam-Webster defines as “any of several recessive genetic conditions characterized by the accumulation of lipid-containing cells in the viscera and nervous system, intellectual disability, and impaired vision or blindness
especially TAY-SACHS DISEASE"
Jerry Jacobson


lydgateaction@...
 

Yes that term (Amaurotic Familial Idiocy) was used for about 20 years before the disease was really identified, but the original question was about the 19th century. Between about 1870 and 1900 this term might have been used for a few cases by very astute clinicians -- I'm guessing but I would have thought just a dozens of cases. However if this exact term was used AND there was a family history I'd imagine that this was the diagnosis. I think that by 1900 only about 100 or so cases had been described worldwide (albeit there would have been many others that had not been identified as such). 

Was this death certificate in the 1800s?

Aubrey Blumsohn

Sheffield