Looking for a town #russia


hsalmenson@...
 

According to information given to me by my mother, my grandfather was born in the town of Yaneshik in the Russian Empire on 07/15/1893. I cannot find the town in the town finder. Is there an alternate name for the town.
Herman Salmenson


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Janeček is now in Slovakia.  In 1893, most of Eastern Europe was Russia, Austria or Prussia, and this town was in the Russian Empire. The problem you had is that you used the Jewish Communities Database, which finds major Jewish centers, but many Jews lived in smaller towns with only a few Jews. Jewishgen has a Gazetteer also, but they try to point you away from it. The Gazetteer will find the big Jewish communities also, but 'clutter' most searches with many tiny towns; I always use the Gazetteer.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

"According to information given to me by my mother, my grandfather was born in the town of Yaneshik in the Russian Empire on 07/15/1893. I cannot find the town in the town finder. Is there an alternate name for the town."


Michele Lock
 

If you are sure it is a town in the Russian Empire, Yanishik is likely Yanishok, the Yiddish name for the town now known as Joniskis, in the Siauliai district of  northern Lithuania. Other names you can find on old records for the town are Yanisky or Janizky. 

You can look for records on Jewishgen, to see if you find your family there (look in Lithuania, in the Siauliai uyezd of Kovna gubernia). Also, US records like ship passenger lists and naturalization records would likely have the town of origin.
--
Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Rabinowitz in Papile, Lithuania and Riga, Latvia
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


Linda Cantor
 

Actually the town is more likely Joniskis in modern-day Lithuania.  In Yiddish it sounded like Yaneshik.

Linda Cantor
New York City