Naming convention among Romanian Jews in the late 1800's / early 1900's #names


J95Frank@...
 

Naming a child after a deceased relative is a common practice among today's Ashkenazi Jews. Can anyone tell me if this was also true among the Galați Jews of late 19th century?

Thank you.
--
Jay Frank
J95Frank@...


Shimy Karni
 

Hello,

My both parents came from Romania.
My father came from Wiznitz, Bukovina and my mother came from Falticeni, Moldova.
I know for sure that the name was transferred from GF to grandson.
I will give you an example, my GF Hersh Wolf Horn was born in 1887.
I searched the grave of his parents in Wiznitz.
First I found the grave of his father Gershon the son of Wolf.
I knew that his father was called Jente, but there were a couple of Jente graves.
One of them was Jente, the daughter of Hersh (also the date fit what I assumed), so I decided that this grave was her grave. 
It seems that my GF was named after both his GF Hersh and wolf.

Best Regards,
Shimi Karni, Israel 




krausj2@...
 

I've done a fairly extensive family tree of the Holdengrabers from the Bukovina region for most of the 19th century. From what I can tell, they (we) had a strong tradition of naming after the deceased with multiple grandchildren and great-grandchildren sharing the names of ancestors who died soon before they were born. Take that with a grain of salt since I assumed some of the naming tradition as I made connections, but the times, places, and relationships line up and make that tradition seem very much likely.

Good luck, and I'd be glad to hear from real authorities.
--
Joe Kraus
krausj2@...


jack nathanson
 

In Romania, Jewish children were definitely named after deceased ancestors. My late father, Nathan (Nuta), born in Raducaneni in 1911, was named after his paternal grandfather, Nuta Tailic. As a matter of fact, the name "Nuta" was so common in the family that the family name was eventually changed from "Tailic" to "Natanzon".

Jack Nathanson,
Montreal,
nathanson1947@...


David Harrison <djh_119@...>
 

Jack

Certainly this also happened in The Netherlands.  I have a large slice of an ancestral tree in which a series of first cousins have the same given name with a ripple of third cousins all using the same given name.  I am very thankful that the Dutch do not have a once in ten years census, they have house books which are open for a whole decade and are cross reference between books showing where people have come from or went to.  This has given me a child who went to relations for several years and then returned (to make a new entry in that book)  Other information can be found on Birth Certificates, which if signed by the Postmaster or town Clerk instead of parents , indicates thar parents could not read, this was a requirement for signing such a document.

David Harrison
Birmingham, Great Britain


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of jack nathanson via groups.jewishgen.org <nathanson1947=yahoo.com@...>
Sent: 15 November 2021 21:52
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Naming convention among Romanian Jews in the late 1800's / early 1900's #names
 
In Romania, Jewish children were definitely named after deceased ancestors. My late father, Nathan (Nuta), born in Raducaneni in 1911, was named after his paternal grandfather, Nuta Tailic. As a matter of fact, the name "Nuta" was so common in the family that the family name was eventually changed from "Tailic" to "Natanzon".

Jack Nathanson,
Montreal,
nathanson1947@...